Ciudad Rodrigo Castle

Ciudad Rodrigo, Spain

The castle of walled city Ciudad Rodrigo was built by the medieval King Enrique II of Castile in 1372. The artillery barrier that surrounds the castle was built in the early 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 1372
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alejandro Mardomingo (18 months ago)
Hay otros sitios más lujosos, pero es un hotel único, como casi todos los paradores. Bien cuidado, vistas increíbles desde torreón y jardines, en un pueblo precioso y cerca de parajes increíbles. La comida estupenda. El servicio, eficaz, amable, respetuoso y cercano. Me llevo un muy buen recuerdo.
Butch/Myra Frana (18 months ago)
A gorgeous spot to spend a vacation. Spent the night in the castle. Beautiful furnishings and a room fit for a king. You can walk the fortress walls and have a great view of the Roman bridge below. A must see. Paradore hotels are outstanding.
Maria Jesus Carrera Montero (18 months ago)
Relax
Rory O Brien (19 months ago)
Wonderful letter from the Duke of Wellington celebrating his Irish soldier but no translation or transcription
Iúri Vieira (2 years ago)
Beautiful and historical place.
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