Ciudad Rodrigo Cathedral

Ciudad Rodrigo, Spain

Construction of the Ciudad Rodrigo Cathedral began in the 12th century and did not finish until the 14th century. The architecture of the cathedral is uniform, despite later reforms and additions that can be seen in some of the chapels, such as the San Blas chapel.

The Portico del Perdón alone contains more than 400 Romanesque and Gothic sculptures of great beauty. Although it began in the 12th century, the work continued to the 15th, meaning that its style shows a clear transition from Romanesque to Gothic, as well as the Neoclassic tower.

One of the principal attractions is the impressive Gothic vault. The choir should not be forgotten either, strangely it has no religious motifs instead is decorated with fauna and flora images. The cloister is wonderful and is where the contrast between the two styles of architecture is best noted.

Another jewel, the impressive Portico del Perdon is compared by some to the Catedral de Santiago de Competela. During the War of Independence this part of the building was fired at by Napoleonic troops and has the impacts of cannon fire on it.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kytuuup (2 years ago)
If you like to reminesce and get to know more about Spain historically this is one of those you should visit and take 2 days in the city to appreciate the local restaurants
Mª Evangelina Rodríguez (2 years ago)
Preciosa tanto desde el exterior como desde el interior. Merece la pena entrar y dedicarle un ratito a mirar los detalles del claustro. La visita al museo también tiene interés. Es pequeño, está muy bien presentado para admirar las imágenes preciosas, casi todas de autores anónimos, los cuadros, ornamentos y hasta varios pares de zapatos y guantes de los obispos que dan un toque del día a día en la vida de los antiguos obispos. Recomiendo la visita.
Lou Acero (3 years ago)
Worth taking the time to see.
Javier Jiménez (3 years ago)
Ok
Mark Auchincloss (3 years ago)
Beautiful 12th/14th romanesque/gothic style Cathedral. Roman cloisters. Amazing 13th Pardon Porch similar to The Glory Porch in Santiago Cathedral.The hand carved choral chairs are pretty too. See if you can spot where the apostle Santiago is in the ceiling!
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