The Monastery of St. Nino at Bodbe is a Georgian Orthodox monastic complex and the seat of the Bishops of Bodbe. Originally built in the 9th century, it has been significantly remodeled, especially in the 17th century. The monastery now functions as a nunnery and is one of the major pilgrimage sites in Georgia, due to its association with St. Nino, the 4th-century female evangelist of Georgians, whose relics are shrined there.

Landscape and architecture

The Bodbe Monastery is nested among tall Cypress trees on a steep hillside overlooking the Alazani Valley, where it commands views of the Greater Caucasus mountains.

The extant church – a three-nave basilica with three protruding apses – was originally built between the 9th and 11th centuries, but has been significantly modified since then. Both exterior and interior walls have been plastered and bear the traces of restoration carried out in the 17th and 19th centuries. It consists of a small hall church with an apse built over St. Nino’s grave that is integrated into a larger aisled basilica. A free-standing three-storey bell-tower was erected between 1862 and 1885. Part of the 17th-century wall surrounding the basilica was demolished and the earlier original one restored in 2003.

History

According to Georgian tradition, St. Nino, having witnessed the conversion of Georgians to the Christian faith, withdrew to the Bodbe gorge, in Kakheti, where she died c. 338-340. At the behest of King Mirian III (r. 284-361), a small monastery was built at the place where Nino was buried. The monastery gained particular prominence in the late Middle Ages. It was particularly favored by the kings of Kakheti who made choice of the monastery as the place of their coronation. Pillaged by the troops of Shah Abbas I of Persia in 1615, the Bodbe monastery was restored by King Teimuraz I of Kakheti (r. 1605-1648). With the revival of monastic life in Bodbe, a theological school was opened. The monastery also operated one of the largest depositories of religious books in Georgia and was home to several religious writers and scribes.

After the annexation of Georgia by the Russian Empire (1801), the Bodbe monastery continued to flourish under Metropolitan John Maqashvili and enjoyed the patronage of Tsar Alexander I of Russia. In 1823, the monastery was repaired and adorned with murals. Upon John’s death in 1837, the Russian Orthodox exarchate active in Georgia since 1810 abolished the convent and converted it into a parish church. In the following decades, the monastery went into disrepair, but, in the 1860s, Archimandrite Macarius (Batatashvili) began to restore the monastery and established a chanting school. The chapel housing St. Nino’s relics were refurbished by Mikhail Sabinin in the 1880s. In 1889, Bodbe was visited by Tsar Alexander III of Russia who decreed to open a nunnery there. The resurrected convent also operated a school where needlework and painting was taught.

In 1924, the Soviet government closed down the monastery and converted it into a hospital. In 1991, after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Bodbe monastery was resumed as a convent. Restoration works were carried out between 1990 and 2000 and resumed in 2003.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Viki Dixit (3 years ago)
Very beautiful monastery with very beautiful gardens and nearby beautiful mountains
Mayur Pawar (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit..
Voughn D'souza (3 years ago)
Just loved this placeee.
Johan Lambrechts (3 years ago)
The walk down to the spring and back up is HECTIC. Stunning monastary with mknd bending acoustics. Even a whister sounds like a trumpet due to the smooth walls and no soft furnishings to absorb. The gardens are also great.
GiorGi KaKashvili (3 years ago)
At the "Bodbe Monastery", her relics are enshrined and her holy tomb is worshipped. The Monastery dates from the 9th century and is located only at 2 km from Signagi. The "Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church" is responsible for the complex, which is now a nunnery. It consists a small hall church, with an annex built over Saint Nino's gravesite, which is integrated into the basílica. At its side, a separate bell tower erected between 1862 and 1885. The "Bodbe Monastery of Saint Nino" is a major center of pilgrimages in Georgia and should not be missed by all those visiting Signagi.
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