Kvelatsminda Church

Gurjaani, Georgia

The Gurjaani Kvelatsminda Church of the Dormition of the Mother of God is a Georgian Orthodox church constructed in the 8th or 9th century, during the 'transitional period' in the medieval Georgian architecture. It is located in the town of Gurjaani in Georgia's easternmost region of Kakheti.

The Gurjaani church is the only extant example of a two-dome church design in the territory of Georgia. It is mostly built of straight courses of cobblestone; corners and decorations are made of squares of pumice stone and arches, vaults, and pillars consist of brick. The church is a complex design, some portions of it organized as two-storey structures. Naves are separated by two pairs of pillars. A high, span-roofed middle nave ends in a horseshoe apse and is divided into three square portions. Each of the outermost squares are topped by low octahedral domes, crowned with vaults. In the 17th century, Persian invasions and Dagestani inroads into the area resulted in abandonment of church services which would not resume until 1822. In 1845, however, the clergy of Gurjaani moved to the Khirsa Monastery and the Kvelatsminda Church was once again abandoned. In 1938, the Georgian authorities cleaned the area of the church and restored it as a historical monument. Further conservation works were conducted in 2010.

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Details

Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teimuraz Gogitidze (DocTemur) (8 months ago)
Very calm and nice place to visit while you are in Gurjaani!
Otar Melia (3 years ago)
Holly place! Old historical church!
Otar Melia (3 years ago)
Holly place! Old historical church!
ZaZa M. (3 years ago)
Great church. Amazing building. Unique construction. The only Georgian church with two domes. Situated in the middle of a forest and amazing nature. This place usually have many visitors. Currently the church is under renovation process.
ZaZa M. (3 years ago)
Great church. Amazing building. Unique construction. The only Georgian church with two domes. Situated in the middle of a forest and amazing nature. This place usually have many visitors. Currently the church is under renovation process.
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