Gremi is a 16th-century site of royal citadel and the Church of the Archangels. The complex is what has survived from the once flourishing town of Gremi.

Gremi was the capital of the Kingdom of Kakheti in the 16th and 17th centuries. Founded by Levan of Kakheti, it functioned as a lively trading town on the Silk Road and royal residence until being razed to the ground by the armies of Shah Abbas I of Persia in 1615. The town never regained its past prosperity and the kings of Kakheti transferred their capital to Telavi in the mid-17th century. There was big Armenian population.

The town appears to have occupied the area of approximately 40 hectares and to have been composed of three principal parts – the Archangels’ Church complex, the royal residence and the commercial neighborhood. Systematic archaeological studies of the area were carried out in 1939-1949 and 1963-1967, respectively. Since 2007, the monuments of Gremi have been proposed for inclusion into the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Architecture

The Archangels’ Church complex is located on a hill and composed of the Church of the Archangels Michael and Gabriel itself, a three-story castle, a bell tower and a wine cellar (marani). It is encircled by a wall secured by embrasures, turrets and towers. Remains of the secret tunnel leading to the Ints’obi River have also survived.

The Church of the Archangels was constructed at the behest of King Levan of Kakheti (r. 1520–1574) in 1565 and frescoed by 1577. It is a cruciform domed church built chiefly of stone. Its design marries traditional Georgian masonry with a local interpretation of the contemporary Iranian architectural taste. The building has three entrances, one facing west, one facing to the south, and the third facing to the north. The interior is crowned with a dome supported by the corners of the sanctuary and two basic piers. The façade is divided into three arched sections. The dome sits on an arcaded drum which is punctured by eight windows.

The bell-tower also houses a museum where several archaeological artifacts and the 16th-century cannon are displayed. The walls are adorned with a series of portraits of the kings of Kakheti by the modern Georgian painter Levan Chogoshvili (1985).

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Salome Chargazia (2 months ago)
Interesting and important historic monument, but needs some re-contraction
ალეკო თბილისი (3 months ago)
Great piece of history and location on the river. Castle type monastery and church. Worth stopping at. Little walk up hill and from road. But worth the effort. Beautiful view of the valley
Helma ს (8 months ago)
Gremi (გრემი) is a 16th-century architectural monument – the royal citadel and the Church of the Archangels – in Kakheti. The complex is what survived from the once flourishing town of Gremi.
Giorgi Ruadze (9 months ago)
Gremi monastery, 16th century. Unique Orthodox church and fortress
Tornike Asatiani (10 months ago)
First of all this is a residence of the Kings of Kakheti and the Archangel's church is only a part of the fortress complex, which has its military, residential and religious parts. The museum of the Kings is open til 1800hrs
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