Martvili Monastery

Martvili, Georgia

Martvili Monastery sits upon the highest hill in the vicinity and was of strategic importance. The site upon the hill where the monastery stands today was used in ancient times as a pagan cultural center and was a sacred site. There once stood an ancient and enormous oak tree that was worshipped as an idol of fertility and prosperity. Infants were once sacrificed here as well. After the conversion of the native population to Christianity, the ancient tree was cut down so as not to worship it anymore. A church was originally constructed in the late 7th century upon the roots of the old oak tree and was named in honor of Saint Andrew who preached Christianity and converted the pagans across the Samegrelo region.

The main Martvili-Chkondidi Cathedral (Chkoni translates to 'oak') was reconstructed in the 10th century after invasions that destroyed the prior church. Preserved in the church are frescoes of the 14th to 17th centuries.

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Address

Martvili, Georgia
See all sites in Martvili

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz Krzyżankowski (16 months ago)
Very quiet and beautiful place. Especially garden
Mateusz P. (16 months ago)
One of the most beautiful sacral places i have ever seen - because of it impressive location and almost zero tourists it had a unique atmosphere
Richard Zukhbaia (16 months ago)
Beautiful place
Piotr Ł. (17 months ago)
Such a calm place.
Elain Yousef (19 months ago)
nice place to visit
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