Zarzma Monastery

Zarzma, Georgia

The Zarzma monastery is nested in the forested river valley of Kvabliani in the Adigeni municipality, 30 km west of the city of Akhaltsikhe. It is the complex of a series of buildings dominated by a domed church and a belfry, one of the largest in Georgia.

The earliest church on the site was probably built in the 8th century, by the monk Serapion whose life is related in the hagiographic novel by Basil of Zarzma. According to his source, the great nobleman Giorgi Chorchaneli made significant donation – including villages and estates – to the monastery. The extant edifice dates from the early years of the 14th century, however. Its construction was sponsored by Beka I, Prince of Samtskhe and Lord High Mandator of Georgia of the Jaqeli family. What has survived from the earlier monastery is the late 10th-century Georgian inscription inserted in the chapel's entrance arch. The inscription reports the military aid rendered by Georgian nobles to the Byzantine emperor Basil II against the rebellious general Bardas Sclerus in 979. In 1544, the new patrons of the monastery – the Khursidze family – refurnished the monastery.

The façades of the church are richly decorated and the interior is frescoed. Apart from the religious cycles of the murals there are a series of portraits of the 14th-century Jaqeli family as well as of the historical figures of the 16th century. After the Ottoman conquest of the area later in the 16th century, the monastery was abandoned and lay in disrepair until the early 20th century, when it was reconstructed, but some of the unique characteristics of the design were lost in the process. 

Currently, the monastery is functional and houses a community of Georgian monks. It is also the site of pilgrimage and tourism.

A smaller replica of the Zarzma church, known as Akhali Zarzma ('New Zarzma') is located in the same municipality, near Abastumani. It was commissioned by Grand Duke George Alexandrovich, a member of the Russian imperial family, from the Tbilisi-based architect Otto Jacob Simons who built it between 1899 and 1902, marrying a medieval Georgian design with the contemporaneous architectural forms. Its interior was frescoed by the Russian painter Mikhail Nesterov.

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Details

Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Mariam M (15 days ago)
The Zarzma monastery is a medieval Orthodox Christiam monastery located at the same mamed village in Samtskhe-Javakheti region, southwest Georgia. The origin of the Zarzma Monastery is attributed to a famous monk of the sixth and seventh centuries, Serapion Zarzmeli. In an important biography of Georgian literature 'The Life of Serapion Zarzmeli', dating to early feudal times, it is written that the ruler of this region, Georgi Chorchaneli, helped Serapion establish the monastery. The text adds that the church was the center-piece of the monastery complex and the architect was Garbaneli. Today buildings from Serapion's time do not remain, although a tenth-century inscription from a building of that period has been incorporated into the arch stone above the northern entrance of a chapel connected to the existing belltower. The main church was ordered built by Века I in the early 14th century. The yard is well tended and full of various flowers.
ალექს ლანდემორ (41 days ago)
Medieval Orthodox Christian monastery located at the village of Zarzma in Samtskhe-Javakheti region,Adigeni mun.The earliest church on the site was probably built in the 8th century, by the monk Serapion whose life is related in the hagiographic novel by Basil of Zarzma.According to his source, the great nobleman Giorgi Chorchaneli made significant donation – including villages and estates – to the monastery.What has survived from the earlier monastery is the late 10th-century Georgian inscription inserted in the chapel's entrance arch.The façades of the church are richly decorated and the interior is frescoed.
Giorgi Ghonghadze (3 months ago)
It was very exciting and nice place
Keti Gogeliani (10 months ago)
The Church is well painted, with small detailed scenes. Very beautiful inside. The road is good
Giorgi Balakhashvili (15 months ago)
Religious and historical place, with beautiful priests and religious persons, praying, singing and working there.
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