Rabati Castle in Akhaltsikhe, Georgia, was originally established in the 9th century as the Lomisa Castle. It was completely rebuilt by Ottomans. Most of the surviving buildings date from the 17th and 18th centuries.

According to the Georgian Chronicles the city was established in the 9th century by Guaram Mampal, son of the King of Tao. From the 13th to the end of 14th centuries it was the capital city of Samtskhe-Saatabago, ruled by the Georgian princely (mtavari) family and a ruling dynasty of the Principality of Samtskhe, the House of Jaqeli.

In 1393 the city was attacked by the armies of Tamerlane. Despite the Turko-Mongol invasions fortress withstood and continued to thrive. After the Treaty of Constantinople in 1590, the whole territory of Samtskhe-Saatabago went under the rule of Ottoman Empire. Turks Mostly used to build defensive edifices. In 1752 first mosque was built in Rabati.

Metropolitan John writes in the late 18th century that 'despite the fact that a large part of the population has been Islamized, there's still a functioning Orthodox church'. After the Treaty of Georgievsk between the Kingdom of Kartli and the Russian Empire was signed, the question of the fate of Akhaltsikhe arose. The first attempt to take the fortress in 1810 failed. Prince Paskevich successfully stormed the fortress 18 years later, in the great Battle of Akhalzic. After the Treaty of Adrianople in 1829, the Ottomans yielded part of Akhaltiske Region.

The fortress and its adjacent buildings were extensively rebuilt and renovated in 2011-2012 in order to attract more tourists to the area.

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Akhaltsikhe, Georgia
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Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Vano Pukhauri (9 months ago)
The Rabath castle easily can impress everyone.It is huge and after the serious renovation looks excellent. Nice place to spend some time and it is so easy to take great pics.
gayathri madhavan (9 months ago)
Historically interesting I suppose. For me the most exciting was the mosque. It's a pleasant walk but feels like an attraction made for tourist. Can skip it if you are pressed for time but can read up its importance on Wikipedia.
carissa stamenkovic (9 months ago)
You don't really get an ancient feel there, modernised on the inside. But prob a nice couple of hour outing.
Andrzej Edward M. (10 months ago)
Interesting place a bit off the beaten path and due to reconstitution not listed in UNESCO, but still if you will take guided tour inside - costs close to nothing - you will find it quite interesting.
Chris JIPA (11 months ago)
Highly informative (go for the guided tour as it's worth every penny), breathtaking sights and great overall experience. Thoroughly enjoyable - would recommend without blinking!
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