Jellhaugen Mound

Halden, Norway

Jellhaugen is the second largest burial mound in Norway and among the largest in Scandinavia and Northern Europe. It has a diameter of 85 metres and a height of around 9 metres. It's difficult to know exactly how old it is, but another nearby burial site known as the Jellhaugen Mound has been dated to around 1,500 years ago.

A saga tells that the mound is buildt for a king called Jell, however these tales are from more modern times and cannot be trusted. The mound is not completely excavated, only parts of it have been excavated, in 1968 however, it was dug a ditch trough the centre of the mound and the only findings was a cremation grave with burned human bones and a single amber pearl. The grave has been carbon-dated to around 426-598AD, the end of the age of migration. Traces of a early grave robbing was dated to around 692-896AD.

In 2018, using high-resolution ground-penetrating radar, archaeologists have found an ancient Viking cemetery, complete with what appears to be a well-preserved ship burial. A popular mode of interment among the Norse Vikings, ship burials consisting of a longboat covered by a mound were reserved for important personages, such as chieftains.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Halden, Norway
See all sites in Halden

Details

Founded: c. 500 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Johansen (9 months ago)
Jan Gunnar Johansen (11 months ago)
Fint for turister som besøker norske
m. cristina almada (2 years ago)
Lugar sagrado. Onde as oferendas para a próxima vida estão guardadas.
Elinor Jelley (2 years ago)
My favourite mound. Absolute belter.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château des Ducs de Bretagne

The Château des ducs de Bretagne (Castle of the Dukes of Brittany) is a large castle located in Nantes. It served as the centre of the historical province of Brittany until its separation in 1941. It was the residence of the Dukes of Brittany between the 13th and 16th centuries, subsequently becoming the Breton residence of the French Monarchy. Today the castle houses the Nantes History Museum.

The restored edifice now includes the new Nantes History Museum, installed in 32 of the castle rooms. The museum presents more than 850 objects of collection with the aid of multimedia devices. The castle and the museum try to offer a modern vision of the heritage by presenting the past, the present and the future of the city. Night-time illuminations at the castle further reinforce the revival of the site. The 500-metre round walk on the fortified ramparts provides views not just of the castle buildings and courtyards but also of the town.