Almenar castle was built in the 15th century over the remains of an older castle that can still be seen today. It originally belonged to the Bravo de Laguna and Saravias y Ríos families, and till this day you can still see their coat of arms on the castle’s walls. It has a double-wall enclosure: in the interior one you can find the Keep and the weapon courtyard, and in the exterior one, you can see the defensive walls surrounding a moat with a drawbridge. Antonio Machado’s wife, Leonor Izquierdo was born in this castle on June 12th, 1894, when it was used as the Guardia Civil barracks. Two of Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer’s stories are set in this castle.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Carlos Haro Borobio (2 years ago)
El castillo de Almenar en el que nació Leonor esposa de Antonio Machado esta situado en Almenar a 25 kilometros de Soria En la carretera de Calatayud a Soria Es propiedad particular. Podéis visitar Almenar además del castillo por cierto precioso y cuidado tiene panadería fábrica de embutidos hermita de la Virgen de la Llana
Begoña Lopez (2 years ago)
Me encanta... por sus gentes y su historia... en el Castillo nació Doña Leonor ,la mujer de Antonio Machado...
Pedro Angel Forcada Morales (2 years ago)
Muy bonito y muy bien conservado.Recomendable verlo.
Azucena Franco (2 years ago)
Muy bien conservado exteriormente. Al ser privado es difícil de visitar, lo cual es entendible
Raquel P.R.H. (2 years ago)
Muy bonito. Merece la pena parar a verlo.
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