Almenar Castle

Almenar de Soria, Spain

Almenar castle was built in the 15th century over the remains of an older castle that can still be seen today. It originally belonged to the Bravo de Laguna and Saravias y Ríos families, and till this day you can still see their coat of arms on the castle’s walls. It has a double-wall enclosure: in the interior one you can find the Keep and the weapon courtyard, and in the exterior one, you can see the defensive walls surrounding a moat with a drawbridge. Antonio Machado’s wife, Leonor Izquierdo was born in this castle on June 12th, 1894, when it was used as the Guardia Civil barracks. Two of Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer’s stories are set in this castle.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lluis Pardo peiro (2 years ago)
Lovely place to visit
alfonso sapena (2 years ago)
Nice castle but no access to it. You only see the outside so you don't know what situation it is in.
Marian Barragan Fernandez (2 years ago)
We only saw it from the outside, because it is privately owned, but it is very beautiful.
Antonio Ruiz (2 years ago)
Very interesting. It's the first time I've been able to go see it
Rafael Martin Catalan (5 years ago)
Expectacular
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