Wyher Castle is a moated castle, which lies south of the village center of Ettiswil. It was first mentioned in 1304 as the home of the Freiherr von Wediswil. After passing through several owners, around the end of the 15th century it was acquired by the Feer family. Around 1510, Petermann Feer rebuilt it into a late-Gothic castle. In 1588 it was inherited by Ludwig Pfyffer von Altishofen, whose descendants adopted the name Pfyffer von Wyher. Between 1837 and 1964 it was owned by the Hüsler family, who were local farmers.

In 1964 a fire partially destroyed the castle and it was acquired by the canton. Renovations in 1981–83 and 1992–96 repaired the damage and restored the moat. In 1996 it became a museum, housing the Josef Zihlmann collection of local religious art.

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Founded: c. 1304
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrei Kovalev (14 months ago)
Nicely decorated and renovated event location. Situated in così marvelous surrounding. Outside looks like a snowwhite castle. At closer consideration ist a real castle with water front and protective walls and towers and a bridge. There is a movie theater inside.
David Isenschmid (2 years ago)
Beautiful renovated castle
Johannes Mayr (2 years ago)
Top restauriertes Wasserschloss. Geeignet für Anlässe aller Art. Sehr zu empfehlen.
Gabriele Schauerhammer (2 years ago)
Wir waren das erste Mal im Schloss zu Gast. Es war sehr schön und das Personal sehr freundlich. Die Küche war auch sehr gut. Wir werden sicher wieder mal hingehen. Danke und macht weiter so....
Steivan Q. Steiner (3 years ago)
Geils HZ gha
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