Butrint Roman Forum

Sarandë, Albania

In 44 BC, Rome colonized Butrint. One of the city's greatest periods of prosperity occurred under the Roman Empire. The Roman Forum was constructed in the Augustan period (27 BC-AD 14) and later aggrandized in the 2nd century AD. Numerous baths, fountains, and public buildings were constructed during this period. A prominent and wealthy woman, named Junia Rufina, adorned in marble a spring dedicated to nymphs bearing her name. The Forum came to an end in the late 4th century AD, as a result of a devastating earthquake. 

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Butrint, Sarandë, Albania
See all sites in Sarandë

Details

Founded: 27 BCE - 14 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Albania

More Information

butrint.nd.edu
whc.unesco.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anthony Muljadi (3 years ago)
Really cool ruins and hiking
SHAHBAZ SHAIKH (3 years ago)
To enter the place they charge 6 euros better to pay in Albania currency as it cost less...its a huge place to explore need at least 2 hours..... really beautiful and also provides free wifi and a well maintained place
Shahbaz Shaikh (3 years ago)
To enter the place they charge 6 euros better to pay in Albania currency as it cost less...its a huge place to explore need at least 2 hours..... really beautiful and also provides free wifi and a well maintained place
Zoé Sandle (3 years ago)
Really beautiful and impressive place. The ruins are fairly well preserved and it's an amazing feeling to walk along the paths that people have been walking for 2000 years. The nature is really beautiful as well.
Zoé Sandle (3 years ago)
Really beautiful and impressive place. The ruins are fairly well preserved and it's an amazing feeling to walk along the paths that people have been walking for 2000 years. The nature is really beautiful as well.
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