The so-called Great Basilica was the principal church in late antique Butrint and sections of a 6th century mosaic floor are still preserved. The church was erected on the site of a cistern belonging to the Roman city’s aqueduct and is over 30m long. It followed the characteristic plan and architectural devices prevalent throughout Epirus, employing a central nave flanked by aisles that were screened from the nave by closed colonnades.

At the east end was a tripartite transept and a central pentagonal apse. Remains of the mosaic pavement include trailing ivy tendrils and scrolling guilloche that are also found in the Baptistery, indicating that these two religious monuments are broadly contemporary. The devices are characteristic of mosaicists working in Nikopolis in northwestern Greece. Some time later, most likely in the 13th century when Butrint began to boom once more, the Great Basilica was extensively rebuilt and effectively became Butrint’s cathedral.

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Butrint, Sarandë, Albania
See all sites in Sarandë

Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

www.world-archaeology.com

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Τερρε Σριυαμα (3 years ago)
The church is well preserve, easy to picturing what it was like during the ancient time...
Antonio Servadio (3 years ago)
The "great Basilica" is probably the most relevant point of historical interest within the large Butrint historical Park. Surely impressive and large, this ancient church is still much fascinating, despite the significant damage operated by the events during several centuries. Of course, right now, it is not operated as a church, for services, being (as the whole ancient city area) abandoned since several centuries..
Gomax25 (3 years ago)
A perfect place that must be seen
Torsten Hübsch (3 years ago)
Magic place
Alexia C (5 years ago)
You can still see the column and the shape of the church well. Very nice next to the water.
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