The so-called Great Basilica was the principal church in late antique Butrint and sections of a 6th century mosaic floor are still preserved. The church was erected on the site of a cistern belonging to the Roman city’s aqueduct and is over 30m long. It followed the characteristic plan and architectural devices prevalent throughout Epirus, employing a central nave flanked by aisles that were screened from the nave by closed colonnades.

At the east end was a tripartite transept and a central pentagonal apse. Remains of the mosaic pavement include trailing ivy tendrils and scrolling guilloche that are also found in the Baptistery, indicating that these two religious monuments are broadly contemporary. The devices are characteristic of mosaicists working in Nikopolis in northwestern Greece. Some time later, most likely in the 13th century when Butrint began to boom once more, the Great Basilica was extensively rebuilt and effectively became Butrint’s cathedral.

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Address

Butrint, Sarandë, Albania
See all sites in Sarandë

Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

www.world-archaeology.com

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Torsten Hübsch (9 months ago)
Magic place
Alexia C (2 years ago)
You can still see the column and the shape of the church well. Very nice next to the water.
Lasse Erik (2 years ago)
Love the place so much that I got married there
Bibiána Papp (2 years ago)
Well preserved, nice ruins, and you can see a small mosaic near the altar, dont miss it!
Ivan Radnev (3 years ago)
Although in ruins, the church is sufficiently preserved.
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