Gérgal Castle

Gérgal, Spain

Gérgal Castle was built somewhere during the Late Middle Ages during Muslim rule. By 1492 it had fallen into the hands of the Catholic Monarchs; Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon. They donated the castle to Alonso de Cárdenas, Grand Master of the Order of Santiago, for outstanding services during the Granada War.

During the 16th century it played an important defensive role against the inland raids of Barbary pirates, who were supported by the remaining Moorish population. In 1568 the Moors rebelled and the Christians in Gérgal were massacred and the Moors held the castle. They were driven out some time later and the castle was destroyed by Christian forces to avoid a repeated use by the Moors. Between 1571 and 1620 all the Moors were expelled from the Iberian mainland. This left the area around Gérgal Castle depopulated and open to banditry.

During the first half of the 17th century Gérgal Castle was rebuilt on the site of the old Muslim fortification to restore order and favor repopulation in the area. In the middle of the 18th century it belonged to Isabel Pacheco Portocarrero, Countesss of Puebla del Maestre and Marchioness of Torre de las Sirgadas. She used it for storing storing grains.

The castle we see today dates back to the rebuilding in the 17th century. Its core is a square crenellated tower with lower round towers at its corners. At its north western facade and attached to one of the corner towers is a semicircular bastion. It is build up out of horizontally laid slabs of slate. The castle is now also equipped with a crenellated outer wall, but this was built by the present owner.

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Address

AL-4405 4, Gérgal, Spain
See all sites in Gérgal

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bilindrilla Animaciones (6 months ago)
Fui y estaba cerrado y no había nada alrededor, podría habilitar algo porque tiene muy buena vista.
José Antonio (7 months ago)
Very nice on the outside, inside we could not visit it was closed, and they did not put opening hours.
antonio martínez (8 months ago)
In good state
Joakin Rodos (8 months ago)
The castle of Gérgal is a late medieval defensive construction located in the Andalusian municipality of Gérgal, province of Almería (Spain). Its strategic location to the northeast of the town, on one of the hills that form the foothills of the Sierra de los Filabres, gives it extensive views over the town and the Gérgal boulevard, and is in turn protected to the north by the natural wall that forms the hill of Tables. Its factory is made of masonry made of thick slate slabs placed horizontally. The entire structure and layout of the castle is determined by its defensive function, observing a strict compartmentalization of the different enclosures: there are even loopholes in interior rooms.
Hans Peter Heldt (9 months ago)
Unfortunately, it is privately owned and no longer open to the public. Very nicely restored.
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