Alcazaba of Almería

Almería, Spain

In 955, Almería gained the title of medina ('city') by the Caliph of Cordoba, Abd ar-Rahman III: construction of the defensive citadel, located in the upper sector of the city, began in this period. The alcazaba, provided not only with walls and towers but also with squares, houses and a mosque, was to be also the seat of the local government, commanding the city and the sea nearby.

The complex was enlarged under caliph Al-Mansur and, later, under Al-Jairan, first king of the independent taifa of Almería (1012–1028).

The first line of walls is a wide enclosure corresponding to the first Muslim military camp, used as shelter for the population in case of siege. For this task it was provided with large cisterns.

The first enclosure is separated by the second one by the so-called Muro de la Vela ('Wall of the Sail'), taking its name from a bell that warned the population in case of events such as the arrival of a ship in the port, danger, fires etc. This wall was built by King Charles III of Spain.

In the second enclosure was the residence for the governors, their soldiers and their servants. It included also the mosque, baths, tanks, tents etc.

The third enclosure, the most external, is also the most modern in the complex. After the Christian conquest of Almería, the Catholic monarchs Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon had a castle built in the most elevated sector of the town, more apt to resist the new gunpowder artillery.

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Details

Founded: c. 955 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ian Hussey (10 months ago)
Free to walk around. Game of thrones - Dawn scene filmed there which was cool. Well worth the walk up!
Jay Lamb (10 months ago)
Absolute must visit and free to European residents! Stunning views all around the city and port and a great castle to explore. Still undergoing archeological review and re-construction but definitely worth the steps up to the fort. Easy enough to find and walkable from around the city. Want to visit again in the evening for sunset!
Steven Jones (10 months ago)
Beautifully restored hidden gem. Free entry for EU citizens. Wonderful place.
Phil B (12 months ago)
Great ruin to walk around, make sure you grab the appropriate language leaflet before you make a start into the castle proper. The gardens are lovely and to be enjoyed with a slow stroll and the work happening in the second section should reveal some excellent views into original buildings. Make sure you take suncream and water, it gets hot!
Jeff P (14 months ago)
Wonderful views are worth the climb. Interesting history would benefit from a guided tour but that was unfortunately not offered here. The gardens are quite beautiful and a very relaxing and cool place to escape the heat of the city. It lacks the dazzling beauty of some of the other castles in Andalucia. However, renovations are ongoing and it is only getting better.
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