Moclín Castle

Moclín, Spain

Moclín Castle was built in the mid-13th century to help defend the Nasrid Kingdom of Granada. It is also known as the Hins Al-Muqlin, (literally the fortress of the two pupils). It was built to mark the frontier between the kingdoms of Granada and Castile. The Castillo de Moclín was continuously besieged during the Hispano-Moorish settlement, falling into the hands of the Catholic Kings in 1486. 

The castle is divided into two distinct parts. The first part is defined by the outer walls, which are at their thinnest towards the west and the south, getting lower as they get nearer Tajos de la Hoz. At some points it is the rock not the wall that is used to defend. The entrance to the castle is typical of its time – an entrance gate with a pointed arc, connected to a corridor, running from west to east. Within this first part the “albacar” is also located, interior space between the alcazaba and the outer wall.

The second area of the castle, the alcazaba, can be reached along the Camino Real (the Royal Road) that still exists today. You enter this part of the castle through a more simply decorated gateway, also typical of the time. Here, the Torre de Homenaje tower stands out higher than the others. It is located in the north-eastern part of the enclosure, with views over Alcala La Real. Within the alcazaba, in the upper part, there is also an interesting and very large water cistern, which played an important role during the siege of the castle.

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Address

Calle Mota 14, Moclín, Spain
See all sites in Moclín

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.turgranada.es

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J (12 months ago)
Open Saturday and Sunday. 11am. But sometimes not open when published did have a nice snooze for a few hours and children had no WiFi so had to try to entertain themselves. Amazing views and drive there
Lenka Husarova (13 months ago)
Very nice view.
Peter Husar (13 months ago)
The castle is beautiful, but ruined. Guide tours are twice a day, and at least 5 people need to be present. The guide is in the spanish only. However, the view is magnificent.
Sarah Hawley (16 months ago)
Beautiful scenic route on our day trip.
Ellie Hill (2 years ago)
Beautiful
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