The Palacio de Generalife was the summer palace and country estate of the Nasrid rulers of the Emirate of Granada. The palace and gardens were built during the reign of Muhammed II (1273-1302), Sultan of Granada, and later by Muhammed III (1302–1309). They were redecorated shortly after by Abu I-Walid Isma'il (1313–1324). Much of the garden is a recent reconstruction of dubious authenticity.

The complex consists of the Patio de la Acequia (Court of the Water Channel or Water-Garden Courtyard), which has a long pool framed by flowerbeds, fountains, colonnades and pavilions, and the Jardím de la Sultana (Sultana's Garden or Courtyard of the Cypress). The former is thought to best preserve the style of the medieval Persian garden in Al-Andalus.

Originally the palace was linked to the Alhambra by a covered walkway across the ravine that now divides them. The Generalife is one of the oldest surviving Moorish gardens.

The present-day gardens were started in 1931 and completed by Francisco Prieto Moreno in 1951. The walkways are paved in traditional Granadian style with a mosaic of pebbles: white ones from the River Darro and black ones from the River Genil.

The Generalife is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Granada, along with the Alhambra palace and gardens, and the Albayzín district.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Granada, Spain
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Conrad Vomstein (2 years ago)
Mid-September: We got the tickets for 2 persons online the night before, sadly without the Nasrid Palace, but at least the Alcazaba and Generalife. Generalife is small but beautiful
Daniela Vandasová (2 years ago)
The most beautiful sight in Granada. The gardens and the buildings are ravishing. Wear comfortable shoes and take something to eat, there are drinking fountains. Always buy tickets online if you want to avoid the queue.
Angela M.H (2 years ago)
One of most beautiful royal garden I have even seen. The garden planning is wonderfully integrated with landscape. Layer by layer, interplay with different elements, objects etc. Now is late June, Visitors can thoroughly enjoy themselves during the day. But make sure you have enough time, at least 3 and 1/2 hour I would suggest, to walk through the Generalife.
Globe Trotter (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit. Lots of wonderful architecture and history. Take a hat, some water along with comfortable shoes.
Alex Beaudry (2 years ago)
The gardens are just gorgeous. This is done with very good taste. Good thing also is that it's not too crowded. Absolutely loved my visit and would highly recommend.
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Seville Cathedral

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