Corral del Carbón

Granada, Spain

The Corral del Carbón is a 14th-century monument located in the Spanish city of Granada (Andalusia). It is the only Nasrid alhóndiga (an establishment where grain was sold) preserved in its entirety in the Iberian peninsula.

It was built during the Nasrid reign before 1336, and his original name was Al-Funduq al-Gidida or New Alhóndiga. Located south of the Muslim city, next to the silk market or Alcaicería, to the souk of the Medina and to the Main Mosque, served as inn for merchants in transit, warehouse and wholesale market.

The facade, richly decorated with plaster, is dominated by a large tumid arc (two centers and some shored) provided with alfiz. On its horizontal molding there a Kufic epigraphic decoration. A shaft on it, stands a geminare vain. It is topped by a large overhanging eaves supported by wooden corbels in the Nasrid tradition (Golden Room of the Alhambra).

After the hall, covered with a vault of mocárabes that retains some other polychromatic, it enter to the courtyard. This, of quadrangular plant, is functional without decorative excesses. In its center is a stone basin provided with two pipe stands.

The structure of the three floors provided of galleries that open to the courtyard is formed by stone pillars and beams and footings (the latter carved) of wood. Dickies factory is brick. The interior of the halls is very transformed to house shops and offices.

References:

    Comments

    Your name

    Website (optional)



    Details

    Founded: 14th century
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Ishy McLevey (12 months ago)
    Really lovely place to visit, we had a great time
    Jesica Alvarez (15 months ago)
    A small square with a fountain in the middle, nothing fancy and nothing to do, you can't go to the upper floors. The only cool thing about it is that you can find a machine to buy official tickets for the Alhambra that are usually hard to get.
    Brett Hamilton (15 months ago)
    Not much to see, but very interesting to see! Best to visit on a Sunday when it’s free. Very neat history behind the place!
    Syed Hussain (17 months ago)
    Lovely little museum. Definitely worth a visit. Lots of history!
    Roberto Vizcon (19 months ago)
    Last standing medieval hotel structure where travelers spent the night on their travels along the silk road. Sibarius Restaurant is right down the street from there. Great place for lunch after touring the historic sites.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Hluboká Castle

    Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

    The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

    The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.