Corral del Carbón

Granada, Spain

The Corral del Carbón is a 14th-century monument located in the Spanish city of Granada (Andalusia). It is the only Nasrid alhóndiga (an establishment where grain was sold) preserved in its entirety in the Iberian peninsula.

It was built during the Nasrid reign before 1336, and his original name was Al-Funduq al-Gidida or New Alhóndiga. Located south of the Muslim city, next to the silk market or Alcaicería, to the souk of the Medina and to the Main Mosque, served as inn for merchants in transit, warehouse and wholesale market.

The facade, richly decorated with plaster, is dominated by a large tumid arc (two centers and some shored) provided with alfiz. On its horizontal molding there a Kufic epigraphic decoration. A shaft on it, stands a geminare vain. It is topped by a large overhanging eaves supported by wooden corbels in the Nasrid tradition (Golden Room of the Alhambra).

After the hall, covered with a vault of mocárabes that retains some other polychromatic, it enter to the courtyard. This, of quadrangular plant, is functional without decorative excesses. In its center is a stone basin provided with two pipe stands.

The structure of the three floors provided of galleries that open to the courtyard is formed by stone pillars and beams and footings (the latter carved) of wood. Dickies factory is brick. The interior of the halls is very transformed to house shops and offices.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 14th century
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Ishy McLevey (2 years ago)
    Really lovely place to visit, we had a great time
    Jesica Alvarez (2 years ago)
    A small square with a fountain in the middle, nothing fancy and nothing to do, you can't go to the upper floors. The only cool thing about it is that you can find a machine to buy official tickets for the Alhambra that are usually hard to get.
    Brett Hamilton (2 years ago)
    Not much to see, but very interesting to see! Best to visit on a Sunday when it’s free. Very neat history behind the place!
    Syed Hussain (2 years ago)
    Lovely little museum. Definitely worth a visit. Lots of history!
    Roberto Vizcon (2 years ago)
    Last standing medieval hotel structure where travelers spent the night on their travels along the silk road. Sibarius Restaurant is right down the street from there. Great place for lunch after touring the historic sites.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Abbey of Saint-Étienne

    The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

    Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

    The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

    As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).