Salobreña Castle

Salobreña, Spain

Castillo de Salobreña dates from the 10th century. The current structure which was built during the Nasrid dynasty. Trapezoidal in shape, it has four towers. It has 3 enclosures: the disposition of the interior comes from the old Nasrid palace; the other two, with a defensive function, are a Castilian extension of the end of the 15th century. Refreshing internal gardens surround the architectonic volumes. From its towers it is possible to see the urban network of Salobreña, the fertile plain, the Mediterranean Sea, the close mountain ranges and, even, Sierra Nevada.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Lohr (11 months ago)
Nice castle, but not much to see. Free entry on mondays.
David Shea (11 months ago)
We could not enter because it was a holiday. But the surrounding walkway affords impressive views of Salobreña port, beach and the wide Mediterranean sea. Highly recommended.
Graham Fletcher (13 months ago)
Good food drink service etc. Central location, very generous portions.
Michael Archer (15 months ago)
Was a pretty good Bastille with outstanding 360 degrees views. But we were a bit late and missed some of the castle features. La Roka cafe nearby was terrific
Yvonne Birrane (16 months ago)
Absolutely worth the visit. If your driving park down in the village as the streets are very narrow. Walk up through the little narrow streets which are beautifully paved and white painted house with vibrant colours. The castle is open from 10_14hr and 16_30_18.00 €2entry.Really worth a visit.
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