Castle of Sancti Petri

San Fernando, Spain

Situated on the little island, the defensive Sancti Petri fortification was once one of a series of forts that protected the inlet, Caño de Sancti Petri. Of irregular shape and in the Moorish style, it dates from the 13th century. During the 1st century, the Phoenicians settled on the island, founding a temple dedicated to Melqart, their god. When the Romans arrived they dedicated the temple to Hercules.

The castle's watchtower is the oldest building, while the walls and the interior date from the 18th century. The castle was in an advanced state of deterioration, but the authorities of the municipalities of San Fernando and Chiclana de la Frontera funded a major rehabilitation programme.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

San Fernando, Spain
See all sites in San Fernando

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janura Bladesbane (3 years ago)
Amazing history and a fun trip across the bay.
Osswen Cashtrain (3 years ago)
Wonderful sight. Rich history.
roberts levin (3 years ago)
Good location for sea kayak training for consistent level 3 conditions.
T F (4 years ago)
Not much to see here. When you go on monday when "entrance is free", also the single bar and the building are closed. We won't go a second time.
O K (4 years ago)
Not much to see here. When you go on monday when "entrance is free", also the single bar and the building are closed. We won't go a second time.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.