Roman Theatre

Cádiz, Spain

The Roman theatre of Cádiz is an ancient structure discovered in 1980. The theatre, which was likely built during the 1st century BC and was one of the largest ever built in the Roman empire, was abandoned in the 4th century and, in the 13th century, a fortress was built on its ruins by order of King Alfonso X of Castile.

The theatre featured a cavea with a diameter of more than 120 meters, and could house some 10,000 spectators. The theatre was one of the few Roman structures of ancient Hispania mentioned by classical authors, including Cicero and Strabo. Excavations in the site have also found remains of a quarter dating to the taifa period, Almohad houses and 17th century pits.

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Address

Calle Mesón 17B, Cádiz, Spain
See all sites in Cádiz

Details

Founded: 1st century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christopher Davies (10 months ago)
This site was only discovered in the 1980s and shows the remarkable remains of the theatre. The accompanying explanatory displays are excellent. I was particularly taken by the long high arched corridor which gave access to the seating. It gave an insight into how the building worked.
Adam Miles (10 months ago)
THIS IS A GEM OF A PLACE!!!! It may be very hidden and hard to find (even if you have an address) but it is a MUST VISIT LOCATION. And please give a donation - they really, really deserve it!!
Brendan Geraghty (10 months ago)
The Roman theatre is fantastic such a treasure to be found in the middle of Cadiz.. Well worth a visit.
Teresa Davila (11 months ago)
Entry is free and a great experience. History provided and exhibition on how the theatre would have been built. To see Roman ruins up close and in person was wonderful. We could not find it and got turned around a few times just be patient and ask the locals, they are helpful. Check for hours so you don't arrive when closed.
Marta Rodenas (12 months ago)
The entrance is hard to find, google maps takes you to where the ruins are but not the entrance center. There is a picture that describes how to get there if you go to where the Google location takes you. The Roman theatre is free to enter so it’s a must-see for anyone who loves history and is on a budget. The theatre was only discovered in 1980 despite it being there for so long! It was used as a fort at one point as well. All of the history is described in the small museum that’s attached to the ruins.
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