Alcazar of Jerez de la Frontera

Jerez de la Frontera, Spain

The Alcazar of Jerez de la Frontera is a former Moorish alcázar, now housing a park. A first fortress was probably built in the 11th century, when Jerez was part of the small kingdom of the taifa of Arcos de la Frontera, on a site settled since prehistoric times in the south-eastern corner of the city. In the 12th century, a new structure was erected to be used as both residence and fortress by the Almohad rulers of southern Spain. Later, after the Reconquista of Andalusia, it was the seat of the first Christian mayors.

Its various parts, which have been magnificently restored, include the Christianised Mosque dedicated to Santa María la Real, the Arabic Baths, the Oil Mill and the beautiful gardens.

The Dark Chamber is located in the tower of Villavicencio Palace (17th-18th centuries) in the Fortress, the oldest monument in this city. The visit includes a ticket for two exhibitions. The first one is about the dark chambers in the world. The second one is a themed exhibition about Jerez, explained by a guide who stands out the most important monuments.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

acacia reiche (9 months ago)
Very cute space, lots to see. Not ideal if you have a stroller to go up the wall.
John Hammond (11 months ago)
Well worth €5 to pass an hour or two. Camera obscurer wasn't working when we visited in September 2019. Some interesting stuff with most explanations in English.
Rob C (11 months ago)
10 stars out of five A small Alcazar (compared to others) but uncrowded and well kept. Loved it. The signage could do with enhancing, but a minor quibble. Loved it.
Gary Winch (11 months ago)
Interesting Alcazar that had been well preserved and renovated. Obviously not on the same scale as the offerings in Granada and Seville but at only €5 entry it's well worth a visit. In a town short on visitor attractions you will have time if you spend a day or two here.
Olga Mielczarek (13 months ago)
A great little Alcazar. It was almost empty when we went there. Possibly due to no 'entrance' sign. I'm sure they would attract more passing by tourists if they had a clear entrance sign. Otherwise it was excellent. The map was very helpful and the descriptions in English were some of the best on our trip. Highly recommended.
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