Cairo Montenotte Castle

Cairo Montenotte, Italy

Cairo Montenotte castle is famous for having been the object of fighting up to the 16th and 17th centuries because of the battles of succession between the Genoese, the French, the Spanish and the Savoys. These battles devastated this region, causing it to be abandoned definitively by the last owners, who preferred to remain in the village.The origins of the castle go back to long ago, more specifically to the period between the 11th and 12th centuries, when Ottone del Carretto built it as his home after having inherited the mountain property upon the death of his father, Enrico Del Carretto, the main upholder of the family fortune.

As already highlighted, the position of Cairo village, which the castle looked down upon and administered, made it possible to control the business activities along the road which led from Vado to Acqui and Tortona, continuing to Alba and Asti.

At the beginning of the 13th century Otto I ceded his property to the Republic of Genoa and, following this change, the village lived through a prosperous period. There is proof that the castle had many prestigious visitors, among which Conradin, and the famous French troubadour Arnaut Daniel.

In 1322 the castle changed owners again, moving into the hands of Manfredo IV, the Marquis of Saluzzo, and then to the Scarampi lineage, which used it as a residence until the 17th century.Visiting this military base now means visiting a building that was changed greatly, as is confirmed by the building façade which is divided into two distinct blocks for two branches of the Scarampi lineage. The remaining parts of the buildings can instead be attributed to the 15th century and the parallel plastered walls presenting the alternating use of brickwork and stone, as if to create a decoration around the windows, is an element that suggests use for residing rather than for defence.

Unfortunately little remains from the original building. Proof of the Carretto phase can be in the ruins of the tower, positioned behind the rest of the complex. The tower acted as the keep of the fortification, had a square floor and blended in with the walls, which are still partially visible.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.liguriaheritage.it

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandro Karl ALTHAUS (4 months ago)
A bit of a ruin, but significant from other eras in Cairo Montenotte
m c (4 months ago)
Imposing ... but all that steel and concrete cannot be seen.
Roberto Cigliutti (7 months ago)
Even if there are only ruins it is very interesting and they have done a good job of recovery
Maurizio Baiguini (2 years ago)
The renovation a few years ago made it an interesting place to visit, even if a few walls remain standing. The climb is tiring but the view over the town is breathtaking. You can't come to Cairo (or be from Cairo) and miss it !!
Vanda Rabellino (2 years ago)
Beautiful place as a child with friends we were always looking for adventures
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