The open-air museum at Bunge is a folk museum which shows how the Gotlandic peasants of the past lived. The museum's creator, schoolteacher Th. Erlandsson (1869-1953), moved to Bunge from central Gotland at the end of the 19th century. At that time most of Gotland's old buildings had already disappeared and he decided to try to save those that remained. Many local people also became interested in this idea and a piece of land was obtained from the Church. It was to this land that old buildings threatened with demolition could be transported.The first buildings arrived in 1908 – a couple of very old houses from Biskops in the parish of Bunge.

In total there are about 77 buildings at the museum site. There are also picture stones, only to be found on Gotland. The oldest type is from the 5th century, and is believed to be a grave stone.The four much taller picture stones, from the 8th century, are more likely to be memorial stones, although graves are often found nearby.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1908
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

More Information

www.bungemuseet.se

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jasper van der Capellen (4 years ago)
Mycket speciellt och fint museum. I muséet finns t.ex. en Viggen, en Draken, en Lansen, en Tunnan och en SK-60. Alla flygplan är privat ägda.
Håkan Tängerfors (4 years ago)
Trevlig personal
Lars-Åke Vikberg (4 years ago)
Elias Fourati (4 years ago)
An awesome place to be. Contains JA 37 Viggen, SAAB Draken, SAAB SK60, SAAB Lansen and the famous "Tunnan". They have icecream/Pepsi and Ramlösa but you can't use a credit/debit card.
Magnus Wretman (5 years ago)
Har inte varit där och därför så blir det svårt.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.