The open-air museum at Bunge is a folk museum which shows how the Gotlandic peasants of the past lived. The museum's creator, schoolteacher Th. Erlandsson (1869-1953), moved to Bunge from central Gotland at the end of the 19th century. At that time most of Gotland's old buildings had already disappeared and he decided to try to save those that remained. Many local people also became interested in this idea and a piece of land was obtained from the Church. It was to this land that old buildings threatened with demolition could be transported.The first buildings arrived in 1908 – a couple of very old houses from Biskops in the parish of Bunge.

In total there are about 77 buildings at the museum site. There are also picture stones, only to be found on Gotland. The oldest type is from the 5th century, and is believed to be a grave stone.The four much taller picture stones, from the 8th century, are more likely to be memorial stones, although graves are often found nearby.

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Details

Founded: 1908
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

More Information

www.bungemuseet.se

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jasper van der Capellen (13 months ago)
Mycket speciellt och fint museum. I muséet finns t.ex. en Viggen, en Draken, en Lansen, en Tunnan och en SK-60. Alla flygplan är privat ägda.
Håkan Tängerfors (13 months ago)
Trevlig personal
Lars-Åke Vikberg (13 months ago)
Elias Fourati (13 months ago)
An awesome place to be. Contains JA 37 Viggen, SAAB Draken, SAAB SK60, SAAB Lansen and the famous "Tunnan". They have icecream/Pepsi and Ramlösa but you can't use a credit/debit card.
Magnus Wretman (2 years ago)
Har inte varit där och därför så blir det svårt.
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