Fårö Church

Fårö, Sweden

The oldest parts of the Fårö church date from the 15th century, but it has been mainly rebuilt in the 18th and 19th centuries. Lightning struck the steeple in the 18th century, and the spire had to be rebuilt. Later the church became outgrown, so an extension was built towards the east in 1858, when the church doubled its size and took on its present day appearance.

The votive ships made in 1620 and 1767 describe a dramatic seal hunt. Jöns Langhammar and his son Lars set off on a seal hunt in 1767. They drifted to sea on an ice floe, but were rescued by neighbours. As token of his gratitude, Lars promised to give his daughter’s hand in marriage to the son of one of his rescuers.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

699, Fårö, Sweden
See all sites in Fårö

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

More Information

www.segotland.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Hunt (12 months ago)
Nice church, interesting graveyard, burial place of Ingmar Bergman, refugees from the Baltic countries from ww2, a couple of grave stones with runes also what sadly appears to be a section with small graves for babies.
Aleksandras Kulak (14 months ago)
Nice
Tony Börjesdotter Mauritzon (2 years ago)
Small but very nice. I just assisted a funeral there.
Jean-Rémi Dessirier (2 years ago)
Lovely little church where you will find Ingmar Bergman's grave.
Akm Rashedul Hasan (4 years ago)
Its a tranquil place. Well accommodated prayer hall. There is beautiful graveyard too. In the graveyard I found the grave of famous film actor , director INGMAR BERGMAN. I drank water from the tap of graveyard !!
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