Top Historic Sights in Pécs, Hungary

Explore the historic highlights of Pécs

Mosque of Pasha Qasim

The Downtown Candlemas Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, formerly known as the Mosque of Pasha Qasim is a Roman Catholic church in Pécs. It was a mosque in the 16-17th century due to the Ottoman conquest. It is one of the symbols of the city, located in the downtown, on the Széchenyi square. The current building, hundred steps both its length and its width, was built by Pasha Qasim the Victorious between 15 ...
Founded: 1543-1546 | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Bishop’s Palace

King St. Stephen established a bishopric of Pécs in 1009. The origins of the Bishop"s Palace reach back to the 12th century. First it was inhabited by the French Bishop Bonipert and later on by the Hungarian Bishop Mor. Just like the cathedral, the palace is a piece of stylistic history. The Gothic windows and Roman layout are hidden by the Neo-Renaissance facade. Preserved in the smokery is the wooden tobacco ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Early Christian Necropolis

In the 4th century, a remarkable series of decorated tombs were constructed in the cemetery of the Roman provincial town of Sopianae (modern Pécs). These are important both structurally and architecturally, since they were built as underground burial chambers with memorial chapels above the ground. The tombs are important also in artistic terms, since they are richly decorated with murals of outstanding quality dep ...
Founded: 300-400 AD | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Pécs Cathedral

Pécs Cathedral has been a prominent feature of this Hungarian cityscape for centuries. In 1064, after a fire destroyed a Romanesque basilica, the King of Hungary, Peter Orseolo, initiated construction of Pécs Cathedral where the old church had stood. Completed in the twelfth century, it features Romanesque stone carvings of exceptional artistic value. In the 16th century, Turkish conquerors converted it into ...
Founded: 1064 | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Barbican

The Barbican, the 15th century bastion with a circular floor plan used to belong to the wall system of the Bishop"s Castle. Its construction is linked to the visit of General Pál Kinizsi, who came to the town in 1498. In the shadow of the Turkish threat the defence systems of castles and towns were strengthened all around the South. The Gothic-style gate tower was built in the 15th century at the western corne ...
Founded: 1498 | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Jakováli Hasszán Mosque

The mosque of Jakováli Hasszán pasa, which is the most intact Turkish mosque in Hungary, dates from the 16th century. It houses an exhibition of Turkish historical and artistic objects, and at the same time it is a muslim place of worship.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Pécs, Hungary

All Saints Church

All Saints Church is surrounded by a castle-wall-type barrier - by the wall of the former cemetery. The residents of the valley of the Tettye river built a one-navy church here as early as the 13th century. The originally Romanesque style All Saints Church was reconstructed in the 15th century in Gothic style. The exterior is simple, while a short tower stands on the triangular pediment of the main façade. The inte ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.