Top Historic Sights in Norrköping, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Norrköping

Hedvig Church

Hedvig church was built in 1670-1673 for the German people of Norrköping city. Named officially after the queen Hedvig Eleonora av Holstein-Gottorp, it is also called as a German church. The pulpit was brought probably from Germany in the 1720s. The font, made in 1608, was a gift from Stegeborg castle church.
Founded: 1670-1673 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

St. Olaf's Church

St. Olaf's Church (Sankt Olai kyrka) was built betw 1765-1767 to the site of earlier church, which was badly damaged during the attack of Russian army in 1719. The altarpiece is painted by Pehr Hörberg in 1797.
Founded: 1765-1767 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Norrköping Art Museum

The Norrköping Art Museum history began with a generous donation by Swedish industrialist Pehr Swartz at the beginning of the 20th century. The collection was exhibited in Villa Swartz, where the first public museum and library in Norrköping opened in 1913. In the autumn of 1946 Norrköping Museum was inaugurated at Kristinaplatsen. This modernistic building was designed by architect Kurt von Schmalensee. A ...
Founded: 1913 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Lövstad Castle

Lövstad Castle has its origins from the 15th century, but the present building was erected by Axel Lillie in the 17th century. It came to the von Fersen Family through Hedvig Catharina De la Gardie (who was the heir of her mother Hedvig Catharina Lillie) and to the Piper Family through Sophie Piper, who was sister to count Axel von Fersen. The interior is intact since 1926, when the last owner died. Lövstad is ...
Founded: 1630 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Himmelstalund Rock Carvings

Himmelstalund is a large park famous for having one of Sweden's biggest collection of petroglyphs with more than 1660 pictures. Some of the depicted boats having a similar shape as the Hjortspring boat. Oldest features have been dated to the transition between the Late ­Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age (1920­1740 BC).
Founded: 1900 BC | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Johannisborg Fortress Ruins

Johannisborg was fortress built by John, Duke of Östergötland, between 1614 and 1639. It was purposed to protect Norrköping increasing clothing and weapon factories. In 1719 Russian army destroyed the fortress in the Great Northern War and only one tower and some walls survived.
Founded: 1614-1639 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Östra Eneby Church

Östra Eneby church nave was built first around 1200, but arches were added in the 14th century. In the Great Northern War (1719) Russian soldiers burnt it down. The middle nave was rebuilt 1727-1733 and the tower few years later. There are still some medieval frescoes visible in arches.
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Kimstad Church

Kimstad church nave was built in the 1100s and new choirs and chapel were constructed in the 1650s. The tower cap dates from 1770. The altarpiece, 1730, is probably made by the same artist who worked in Stockholm Royal Palace. The late Renaissance pulpit was made between 1660–1669.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Bråborg Castle Ruins

Bråborg was a former Royal castle at Bråviken. The house was built by Queen Dowager Gunilla Bielke in 1588-1590 and she lived there after her husband, King John III of Sweden, died in 1592. Gunilla Bielke herself died at Bråborg in 1597. Bråborg was later owned by her son, duke John of Östergötland. In 1612 he married his cousin, princess Maria Elisabeth of Sweden. They both died at Br&ar ...
Founded: 1588-1590 | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Kullerstad Church

Kullerstad church is a whitewashed Romanesque stone church dating from the 13th century. It is known of two Gunnar"s bridge runestones: according runes there was a man named Håkon who dedicated a bridge to the memory of his son Gunnar. The first runestone was found in the exterior wall of the church of Kullerstad in 1969 and is raised in the cemetery. The second stone was discovered in a church only 500 metres ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Norrköping, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.