Lövstad Castle has its origins from the 15th century, but the present building was erected by Axel Lillie in the 17th century. It came to the von Fersen Family through Hedvig Catharina De la Gardie (who was the heir of her mother Hedvig Catharina Lillie) and to the Piper Family through Sophie Piper, who was sister to count Axel von Fersen.

The interior is intact since 1926, when the last owner died. Lövstad is today a museum open to the public with guided tours. There is a café and a restaurant at the castle.

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Address

1149, Norrköping, Sweden
See all sites in Norrköping

Details

Founded: 1630
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sareh Sh (8 months ago)
Cosy atmosphere Great resturant Wheelchair and stroller accessible
Anne Foo (9 months ago)
Beautiful place. They have a lovely outdoor café next to a nursery with beautiful plants and flowers. There are two categories of castle tour. We managed to go on one - it's worth it. Food at the restaurant was good. Not too pricey. Very well maintained. Dogs are welcomed to the outdoor café and the castle garden and park.
Andreea C (9 months ago)
Beautiful innee garden with a lovely choice of flowers and fika. The castle has well preserved history, would love to visit in the autumn
Johan (10 months ago)
Light meals. Not much to look at if your not interested in gardening.
Gregory Lawrence (2 years ago)
Great tour! Wonderful staff.
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