Norrköping Art Museum

Norrköping, Sweden

The Norrköping Art Museum history began with a generous donation by Swedish industrialist Pehr Swartz at the beginning of the 20th century. The collection was exhibited in Villa Swartz, where the first public museum and library in Norrköping opened in 1913. In the autumn of 1946 Norrköping Museum was inaugurated at Kristinaplatsen. This modernistic building was designed by architect Kurt von Schmalensee. A sculpture park was established in 1960. Today the park features 15 sculptures. One of the more noteworthy is Spiral åtbörd/Spiral Gesture by Arne Jones in front of the entrance.The collection contains artworks from 18thcentury portraits filled with lace and ruffles to 21st-century installations, video art and photography. A selection is presented on the upper level of the museum where many innovative and noteworthy Swedish artists are represented with major works.

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Details

Founded: 1913
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

More Information

www.norrkoping.se

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Lynch (5 months ago)
Great collection of Swedish modern art, beautiful museum
(5 months ago)
The museum is great, really enjoy the visit.
Lu Jiale (7 months ago)
Very small museum with almost no English words available.
Jon TheJon (13 months ago)
Polite Staff. I went there once with my friend and was impressed by the beatiful pictures and paintings. You can reach it easily by walking, if you arrive by train.
Andreas Gavrielides (15 months ago)
The collections are really beautiful and the fact there is no entrance fee makes it a must-go! It is not a huge museum but houses many interesting works of art!
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