Kullerstad Church

Norrköping, Sweden

Kullerstad church is a whitewashed Romanesque stone church dating from the 13th century. It is known of two Gunnar's bridge runestones: according runes there was a man named Håkon who dedicated a bridge to the memory of his son Gunnar. The first runestone was found in the exterior wall of the church of Kullerstad in 1969 and is raised in the cemetery. The second stone was discovered in a church only 500 metres away and is also raised in the cemetery. The second stone informs that Håkon raised more than one stone in memory of his son and that the son died vestr or 'in the West.'

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kenneth Kvist (3 years ago)
Nice little church
Björn Lindahl (4 years ago)
Very nice little church
Anders Andersson (4 years ago)
Very nice
Isabelle Sjöstrand (5 years ago)
Nice church and nice area around
Olle Söderlund (5 years ago)
Baptized our daughter here, cozy little church
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