Top Historic Sights in Sjöbo, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Sjöbo

Övedskloster Castle

In the Middle Ages Övedskloster was a Premonstratensian monastery. In the 16th century Reformation it was moved to Danish Crown. The original castle was destroyed by fire in the beginning of the 17thc century.The current Övedskloster Castle was built in 1765-1776 by Hans Ramel. It was designed by Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The main building represents the French Rococo style and is built of red sands ...
Founded: 1765-1776 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Bjärsjölagård Castle

There was originally a strong fortified castle Beritzholm few hundred meters from the present Bjärsjölagård Castle. It was built by Valdemar Atterdag in the 1300s and demolished in 1526. Peter Julius Coyet bought the estate from Crown in 1720. There was a lime factory in the beginning of the 19th century and two ovens still remain. The current main building was built in Rococo style in 1766 and the souther ...
Founded: 1766-1850 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Sövdeborg Castle

Sövdeborg area belonged to bishops of Lund in the Middle Ages, but after Reformation the Crown of Denmark sold it to Frederik Lange in 1587. He built the new castle to the southern side of small Sövdesjön lake between 1590-1597. It consisted of a moat, tower and central section with two wings. Count Erik Piper made an major reconstruction to the castle in 1840-1844. Sövdeborg is open to the public. Th ...
Founded: 1590-1597 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.