Bjärsjölagård Castle

Sjöbo, Sweden

There was originally a strong fortified castle Beritzholm few hundred meters from the present Bjärsjölagård Castle. It was built by Valdemar Atterdag in the 1300s and demolished in 1526. Peter Julius Coyet bought the estate from Crown in 1720. There was a lime factory in the beginning of the 19th century and two ovens still remain. The current main building was built in Rococo style in 1766 and the southern wing in 1812. The newer addition on the estate, was built in Romantic, German style in 1849-50, on a hill just south of the old castle. It is a three-story building flanked by two square towers. Today Bjärsjölagård is a hotel.

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Details

Founded: 1766-1850
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Douglas Jodahouse (46 days ago)
Old house buildings with limitations. My experience could of been better. Communication as to 'what, when and where' was non existent. Food was served all over the place and cold by the time one sorted out where! Fire alarm about 09am the next morning left myself an partner outside in 5'c without warm clothes for 40min. False alarm caused by personal's incompetence. No apologies! Personal were both arrogant and without understanding. I will never recommend this place for a conference or large celebration because of my total experience. I stayed overnight. Not worth the expense.
Dragan Bosevski (46 days ago)
Köttet till middagen var inte det bästa, feta sega senor i stora bitar. 6pers i sällskapet vid vårt bord, ingen av oss fick bra bitar kött. Upplevelsen och allt det andra vad bra.
Gunilla Olsson (2 months ago)
Vacker plats, god mat och trevlig personal. Kan inte bli bättre!
Anne Svensson (2 months ago)
Ok
Jane Olsson (3 months ago)
Fint och avslappnande ställe. Trevligt att ha konferens och liknande tillställningar här.
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