Sövdeborg Castle

Sjöbo, Sweden

Sövdeborg area belonged to bishops of Lund in the Middle Ages, but after Reformation the Crown of Denmark sold it to Frederik Lange in 1587. He built the new castle to the southern side of small Sövdesjön lake between 1590-1597. It consisted of a moat, tower and central section with two wings. Count Erik Piper made an major reconstruction to the castle in 1840-1844.

Sövdeborg is open to the public. The most impressive room is the stone hall in the southeast corner of the ground floor, with its unique ceiling of stucco and oak. To the west of the house, part of the partially drained lake has been transformed into an English park, with waterways. Water is led into these channels and the old mansion house channels from the lake to the north.

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Details

Founded: 1590-1597
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans Olav Nymand (4 months ago)
Beautiful park but palace only open by appointment for groups of at least 10 people.
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