Övedskloster Castle

Sjöbo, Sweden

In the Middle Ages Övedskloster was a Premonstratensian monastery. In the 16th century Reformation it was moved to Danish Crown. The original castle was destroyed by fire in the beginning of the 17thc century.

The current Övedskloster Castle was built in 1765-1776 by Hans Ramel. It was designed by Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The main building represents the French Rococo style and is built of red sandstone.

The garden is open year-round between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. The castle is the home of the Ramel family and not open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1765-1776
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Camilla Bökberg (2 years ago)
Nice and quiet if you are there just before they open. Very popular. Will be some people during the day! But the area is big so there is no problem! Café & garden trade is also available!
Gabriel Sjögren (3 years ago)
Great place for a cozy Easter trip.
Ulla Jönsson (4 years ago)
Fint och mysigt men jag kunde inte handla någonting eftersom där var verkligen ingen anslutning till Wifi
Leo Tradefelt (4 years ago)
En jul utan ett besök på julmarknaden på övedskloster är ingen jul!
Giorgio Berardi (4 years ago)
We hit upon Övedskloster Manor by chance, while familiarising ourselves with our new surroundings and noticing an unusual - and charming - boulevard lined by centuries-old trees (don't ask me which trees, though). At the head of the boulevard rises the Manor, a rococo structure that has been in the possession of the same family since its construction almost 300 years ago. It is surrounded by lovely gardens, freely accessible to the public, and it is part of a system of footpaths that take you, among other things, to majestic Vomb lake nearby.
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