Top Historic Sights in Sjöbo, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Sjöbo

Övedskloster Castle

In the Middle Ages Övedskloster was a Premonstratensian monastery. In the 16th century Reformation it was moved to Danish Crown. The original castle was destroyed by fire in the beginning of the 17thc century.The current Övedskloster Castle was built in 1765-1776 by Hans Ramel. It was designed by Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The main building represents the French Rococo style and is built of red sands ...
Founded: 1765-1776 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Bjärsjölagård Castle

There was originally a strong fortified castle Beritzholm few hundred meters from the present Bjärsjölagård Castle. It was built by Valdemar Atterdag in the 1300s and demolished in 1526. Peter Julius Coyet bought the estate from Crown in 1720. There was a lime factory in the beginning of the 19th century and two ovens still remain. The current main building was built in Rococo style in 1766 and the souther ...
Founded: 1766-1850 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Sövdeborg Castle

Sövdeborg area belonged to bishops of Lund in the Middle Ages, but after Reformation the Crown of Denmark sold it to Frederik Lange in 1587. He built the new castle to the southern side of small Sövdesjön lake between 1590-1597. It consisted of a moat, tower and central section with two wings. Count Erik Piper made an major reconstruction to the castle in 1840-1844. Sövdeborg is open to the public. Th ...
Founded: 1590-1597 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.