Roman Iron Age

History of Sweden between 0 AD - 399 AD

The Roman Iron Age (1-400) is the name that Swedish archaeologist Oscar Montelius gave to a part of the Iron Age in Scandinavia, Northern Germany and the Netherlands. The name comes from the hold that the Roman Empire had begun to exert on the Germanic tribes of Northern Europe. Therefore, the preceding part of the Iron Age is called the Pre-Roman Iron Age, which had grown out of the Nordic Bronze Age. The age that followed the Roman Iron Age is called the Germanic Iron Age or the Age of Migrations.

In Scandinavia, there was a great import of goods, such as coins (more than 7,000), vessels, bronze images, glass beakers, enameled buckles, weapons, etc. Moreover, the style of metal objects and clay vessels was markedly Roman. Objects such as shears and pawns appear for the first time. In the 3rd century and 4th century, some elements are imported from Germanic tribes that had settled north of the Black Sea, such as the runes. There are also many bog bodies from this time in Denmark, Schleswig and southern Sweden. Together with the bodies, there are weapons, household wares and clothes of wool. Great ships made for rowing have been found from the 4th century in Nydam Mose in southern Denmark.

The prime burial tradition was cremation, but the third century and thereafter saw an increase in inhumation. Through the 5th century and 6th century, gold and silver become more and more common. This time saw the ransack of the Roman Empire by Germanic tribes, from which many Scandinavians returned with gold and silver. A new Iron Age had begun in Northern Europe, the Germanic Iron Age.

Rerefences: Wikipedia

Popular sites founded between 0 AD and 399 AD in Sweden

Hovgården

Hovgården is an archaeological site on the Lake Mälaren island of Adelsö. During the Viking Age, the centre of the prospering Mälaren Valley was the settlement Birka, founded in the mid-8th century and abandoned in the late 10th century and located on the island Björkö just south of Adelsö. Hovgården is believed to have been the site from where kings and chieftains ruled the area. ...
Founded: ca. 100-1520 AD | Location: Ekerö, Sweden

Helgö

The island of Helgö is probably best known for a major archaeological area. The old trading town on Helgö began to emerge around the year 200 AD, 500 years before the well-known Birka. The first archaeological excavaton in 1954 found not only remains of the early settlement, but also a workshop area that became of international interest. Among the finds were a small Buddha statuette from North India and a christening s ...
Founded: 200 AD | Location: Ekerö, Sweden

Greby Grave Field

The Greby grave field is an Iron Age grave field in western Sweden. With its over 180 graves, it is the largest site of this kind in Bohuslän. According to legends, Greby is the resting place of the Scottish warriors who once pillaged Tanum. However, in June 1873, Swedish archaeologist Oscar Montelius examined eleven of the graves and did not find any weapons, only glass pearls, bone combs and other everyday objects, som ...
Founded: 1 - 400 AD | Location: Tanum, Sweden

Onbacken

Onbacken was a complete Iron Age environment dating approximately from 100-500 AD. You can see the foundation for a “long house” (contained dwelling, barn and storage), nine tombs and part of another foundation. On Onbacken lived a large family of three generations (12-15 people). They lived by animal husbandry, farming, fishing and hunting.
Founded: 100-500 AD | Location: Bollnäs, Sweden

Påarp Burial Ground

Påarp is the largest ancient burial ground in Halland. There are 220 barrows, cairns and stone settings. The largest one is 30m wide and 2m high. Archaeologists have dated the site to the Iron Ages (built between 0- 400 AD).
Founded: 0 - 400 AD | Location: Halmstad, Sweden

Ismantorp Fortress

Ismantrop is an ancient fortress, which was used probably between years 300-500 AD. The ringfort consists of a limestone wall approximately 300 meters long and has nine gates. Inside the ringfort were 95 houses arranged in 12 blocks around a central open area with a circular building. Ismantorp is the largest and probably the oldest of the ringforts on Öland. The first written description of Ismantorp dates back to the ...
Founded: 300-500 AD | Location: Borgholm, Sweden

Torsburgen Fortress

Torsburgen was the largest ancient fortress in Northern Europe. It was originally constructed at the beginning of the 1st century AD. It was reinforced during the 4th century and used until c. 1100 AD. A timber-laced stone rampart encircles an area of 12 hectares. Scholars estimate that nearly 1000 soldiers would have been needed to defend it and it could have been providing refuge to the entire population of Gotland that ...
Founded: 100-1100 AD | Location: Katthammarsvik, Sweden

Seby Burial Ground

Seby is one of the largest burial grounds in Öland including 285 graves and stone settings. It was founded in the Roman Iron Age and used until the Viking Ages. The site consists for example of stone ship settings, cairns and tridents. There is a significant runestone located one kilometer to the south of Seby. The inscription says “Ingjald, Näf and Sven let to erect this stone as a memorial to their fa ...
Founded: 300-500 AD | Location: Degerhamn, Sweden

Fjäle Fields

Fjäle fields have long history. The Fjäle farm was established c. 100 AD, and remains of two large iron age houses are still visible on the site. After 7th century AD the large iron age houses were replaced with smaller ones not far away from the old houses. During the 12th century a smaller farm was separated from the main farm, and set up in the northern end of the peoperty. The farms were burnt down during 14 ...
Founded: 100 AD | Location: Katthammarsvik, Sweden

Trullhalsar Burial Field

Trullhalsar is a very well-preserved and restored burial field dating back to the Roman Iron Ages (0-400 BC). There are over 340 different kind of graves like round stones ("judgement rings"), ship settings, tumuli and a viking-age picture stone (700 AD).
Founded: 0-400 AD | Location: Katthammarsvik, Sweden

Domarringen Burial Ground

Domarringen stone circle Skärholmen is a burial site dating from the Bronze Age to Iron Ages. The outer circle was removed in 1960s, but the inner one still exists. The existing circle consists of nine stones and is 12m wide. The outer one was about 50x100m. There are about 80 graves in the area from the 3th century AD to the 8th century. Arcaeologists have found several cheramic items, bones, iron key and bronze jew ...
Founded: 200 - 750 AD | Location: Skärholmen, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Chaumont

The Château de Chaumont was founded in the 10th century by Odo I, Count of Blois. The purpose was to protect his lands from attacks from his feudal rivals, Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou. On his behalf the Norman Gelduin received it, improved it and held it as his own. His great-niece Denise de Fougère, having married Sulpice d'Amboise, passed the château into the Amboise family for five centuries.

Pierre d'Amboise unsuccessfully rebelled against King Louis XI and his property was confiscated, and the castle was dismantled on royal order in 1465. It was later rebuilt by Charles I d'Amboise from 1465–1475 and then finished by his son, Charles II d'Amboise de Chaumont from 1498–1510, with help from his uncle, Cardinal Georges d'Amboise; some Renaissance features were to be seen in buildings that retained their overall medieval appearance. The château was acquired by Catherine de Medici in 1550. There she entertained numerous astrologers, among them Nostradamus. When her husband, Henry II, died in 1559 she forced his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, to exchange Château de Chaumont for Château de Chenonceau which Henry had given to de Poitiers. Diane de Poitiers only lived at Chaumont for a short while.

Later Chaumont has changed hands several times. Paul de Beauvilliers bought the château in 1699, modernized some of its interiors and decorated it with sufficient grandeur to house the duc d'Anjou on his way to become king of Spain in 1700. Monsieur Bertin demolished the north wing to open the house towards the river view in the modern fashion.

In 1750, Jacques-Donatien Le Ray purchased the castle as a country home where he established a glassmaking and pottery factory. He was considered the French "Father of the American Revolution" because he loved America. However, in 1789, the new French Revolutionary Government seized Le Ray's assets, including his beloved Château de Chaumont.

The castle has been classified as a Monument historique since 1840 by the French Ministry of Culture. The Château de Chaumont is currently a museum and every year hosts a Garden Festival from April to October where contemporary garden designers display their work in an English-style garden.