Fjäle fields have long history. The Fjäle farm was established c. 100 AD, and remains of two large iron age houses are still visible on the site. After 7th century AD the large iron age houses were replaced with smaller ones not far away from the old houses. During the 12th century a smaller farm was separated from the main farm, and set up in the northern end of the peoperty. The farms were burnt down during 14th century, possibly during Denmark's attack to Gotland, and were never rebuilt. The area was excavated in the 1970's and 1980's, and building remains were marked to the ground where they can sill be seen.

The farm's well is still in good condition, and the water is still drinkable. Some hundred meters south from the farm remains is the graveyard for the farm's pre-christian residents.

Reconstruction of a 14th century farmhouse and its animal shelter have been built close to the place where the medieval farmhouse stood. A folklore legend of Fjälebysen (Fjäle wraith) says that the owner of the farm still wanders around the area.

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