Castles and Palaces in Liechtenstein

Vaduz Castle

Vaduz Castle is the palace and official residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein. The castle gave its name to the town of Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein, which it overlooks from an adjacent hilltop. The erstwhile owners - presumably also the builders - were the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans. The Bergfried (keep, 12th century) and parts of the eastern side are the oldest. The tower stands on a piece of ground some 12 x ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Vaduz, Liechtenstein

Gutenberg Castle

Gutenberg Castle is one of the five castles of the Liechtenstein principality and one of two that have survived preserved until the present day. The castle hill has been inhabited since the Neolithic Period. Archeological digs have uncovered several prehistoric artefacts, including the 12cm Mars von Gutenberg figurine, now on display in the Liechtenstein National Museum. Gutenberg Castle began its existence as a medieval ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Balzers, Liechtenstein

Obere Burg

Obere Burg ('Upper Castle'), also known colloquially as Burg Neu-Schellenberg, is the larger and older one of the two ruined castles in Schellenberg. Its construction was finished already around 1200. The castles"s first appearance in written records occurred on the 10th of January 1348. According to current estimates, it was inhabited until roughly the 16th century, when it was abandoned and ceased to func ...
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Schellenberg, Liechtenstein

Untere Burg

Untere Burg ('Lower Castle'), also known colloquially as Burg Alt-Schellenberg, is the smaller and newer one of the two ruined castles in Schellenberg. Its construction was finished around 1250. Its first appearance in written records is from 1317. The castle reached the pinnacle of its structural expansion around the year 1350. According to current estimates, it was inhabited until roughly the 16th century, whe ...
Founded: c. 1250 | Location: Schellenberg, Liechtenstein

Schalun Castle Ruins

Schalun Castle, also known colloquially as Wildschloss, was constructed probably during the second half of the 12th century or around the turn of the 12th century. The first written record about the castle comes from 1237. In it, it was also first referred to by name, as 'Schalun'. Archeological digs made in recent decades have revealed only small amounts of artefacts from the medieval and early modern period, s ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Vaduz, Liechtenstein

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ananuri Castle

Ananuri was a castle and seat of the eristavis (Dukes) of Aragvi, a feudal dynasty which ruled the area from the 13th century. The castle was the scene of numerous battles. The current ensemble dates from the 16th and 17th centuries.

In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe of Ksani and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, four years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by the Shamshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. However, in 1746, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. The fortress remained in use until the beginning of the 19th century. In 2007, the complex has been on the tentative list for inclusion into the UNESCO World Heritage Site program.

Architecture

The fortifications consist of two castles joined by a crenellated curtain wall. The upper fortification with a large square tower, known as Sheupovari, is well preserved and is the location of the last defense of the Aragvi against the Shamshe. The lower fortification, with a round tower, is mostly in ruins.

Within the complex, amongst other buildings, are two churches. The older Church of the Virgin, which abuts a tall square tower, has the graves of some of the Dukes of Aragvi. It dates from the first half of the 17th century, and was built of brick. The interior is no longer decorated, but of interest is a stone baldaquin erected by the widow of the Duke Edishera, who died in 1674.

The larger Church of the Mother of God (Ghvtismshobeli), built in 1689 for the son of Duke Bardzem. It is a central dome style structure with richly decorated façades, including a carved north entrance and a carved grapevine crosson the south façade. It also contains the remains of a number of frescoes, most of which were destroyed by the fire in the 18th century.