Vaduz Castle is the palace and official residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein. The castle gave its name to the town of Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein, which it overlooks from an adjacent hilltop. The erstwhile owners - presumably also the builders - were the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans. The Bergfried (keep, 12th century) and parts of the eastern side are the oldest. The tower stands on a piece of ground some 12 x 13 metres and has a wall thickness on the ground floor of up to 4 m. The original entrance lay at the courtyard side at a height of 11 metres. The chapel of St. Anna was presumably built in the Middle Ages as well. The main altar is late-Gothic. In the Swabian War of 1499, the castle was burned by the Swiss Confederacy. The western side was expanded by Count Kaspar von Hohenems (1613–1640).

The Princely Family of Liechtenstein acquired Vaduz Castle in 1712 when it purchased the countship of Vaduz. At this time, Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor, combined the countship with the Lordship of Schellenberg, purchased by the Liechtensteins in 1699, to form the present Principality of Liechtenstein. During the medieval days of the principality, the prince could have sought refuge in the castle from a potential peasant uprising.

The castle underwent a major restoration between 1905 and 1920, then again in the early 1920s during the reign of Prince Johann II, and was expanded during the early 1930s by Prince Franz Joseph II. Since 1938, the castle has been the primary residence of Liechtenstein's Princely Family. The castle is not open to the public as the princely family still lives in the castle.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Liechtenstein

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User Reviews

Heather Yeatman (2 years ago)
Beautiful setting and a must see on Liechtenstein. Private resident of the royal family, but interesting nonetheless.
koko Anastassov (2 years ago)
Very interesting castle and the nature around is very nice. Unfortunately you can’t visit inside. I highly recommend.
cristina crocicchia (2 years ago)
It was closed, but it was really nice. A wonderful view from up there!
Dominik (2 years ago)
The castle is beautiful but you cant get inside or to the side facing down to the valley. Best views are offered from the path along the forest, starting about 100m up the road. The walk from Vaduz is quite steep but takes only a short time.
D C AHN (3 years ago)
Walking is not the only option, however. You get a lovely view of the back of the castle and it's surrounding area. From the city, you see the front of course, but it's definitely worth getting the full picture by getting up close and personal.
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