Gutenberg Castle is one of the five castles of the Liechtenstein principality and one of two that have survived preserved until the present day. The castle hill has been inhabited since the Neolithic Period. Archeological digs have uncovered several prehistoric artefacts, including the 12cm Mars von Gutenberg figurine, now on display in the Liechtenstein National Museum.

Gutenberg Castle began its existence as a medieval church and cemetery on a hilltop. In the early 12th century, the cemetery was cancelled and the fortification of the former church structure had slowly began with the addition of a ring wall, forming a simple, roughly circular keep. During the 12th century, several additions followed, in particular the creation of the main tower as a vertical extension of the existing keep. Later on, the tower was outfited with merlons. The first written record of the castle's name comes from 1296. In the 12th and early 13th century, the castle was in the ownership of the lords of Frauenberg, a noble house from the Swiss canton of Graubünden. After the death of Heinrich von Frauenburg in 1314, the castle became the property of the House of Habsburg. It was then used primarily for guarding the borderlands between the local Habsburg-owned territories and the ones belonging to the independent Swiss cantons.

At the turn of the 15th century, the castle underwent extensive new construction works as part of an initiative by Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I to repair the damage inflicted upon the castle by a siege in 1499, during the Swabian War. Gutenberg Castle possessed a drawbridge until 1537, when the device was damaged by storm and had to be dismantled, never gaining a replacement. During the 17th and 18th century, the castle lost most of its military purpose and was damaged by several fires. It was still being used as a residence around 1750. After a fire in 1795 that greatly damaged Balzers, the castle ruins were used as a source of building material for the reconstruction of the town. The castle was purchased and slightly repaired by the town in 1824, then sold in 1854 to princess Franziska von Liechtenstein.

The castle received a substantial restoration between 1905 and 1912, under the supervision of Vaduz-born architect Egon Rheinberger, its new owner. This restoration added a few new structures and buildings to the lower parts of the castle (see ground plan in references section for more details). After Rheinberger's death in 1936, the castle was rented by the municipality for various events and guests, until it was offered for sale in 1951. In 1979, the castle was purchased by the Principality of Liechtenstein for state and museum purposes. However, the last of the former private owners held her inherited rights to the habitation of the castle until her death in 2001.

The bailey of the castle is open to visitors free of charge all year round. The castle's chapel and rose garden, reconstructed in 2010, are accessible free of charge in the summer tourist season. Guided tours of Gutenberg Castle and its renting for weddings and cultural events are available only during the summer tourist season and need to be arranged in advance by appointment.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Liechtenstein

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User Reviews

John Demetriou (14 months ago)
We went there during night time. The outside courtyard was open and the view at nighttime was amazing. Definitely recommended. Both at daytime and at nighttime. No reason to fear really given that the whole country is one of the safest in Europe and the world
Vivek Shukla (15 months ago)
Nice historical place. This reminds the castle on top hill where you can see all over the city from it
Abu Bakar Sutan Taharudin (15 months ago)
Beautiful castle good to see from far not open for public disappointing
D C AHN (2 years ago)
We travelled by car to Burg Gutenberg Lichenstein after visiting Vaduz, it is a very well preserved castle perched high on a ridge. Burg Gutenberg isn't as famous as Vaduz Castle but it's definitely worth a visit. It's a 10 minute uphill walk but the view from above is simply breathtaking. The castle itself is an imposing structure but you can only enter the courtyard; the castle is locked. However, the view from the courtyard and the hill itself will indeed take your breath away!
Hilary Noonan (2 years ago)
We made the mistake of going on All Saints Day, we guessed that's why it was closed. It's a cool look at the castle and the restoration process. Although we couldn't go in there was signage outside and we enjoyed the walk that curls up the hill past the vineyard to the castle yard above. I will go back on another trip because if the outside is that good the inside must be terrific!
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