Obere Burg ('Upper Castle'), also known colloquially as Burg Neu-Schellenberg, is the larger and older one of the two ruined castles in Schellenberg. Its construction was finished already around 1200. The castles's first appearance in written records occurred on the 10th of January 1348. According to current estimates, it was inhabited until roughly the 16th century, when it was abandoned and ceased to function as a residence. In the following centuries, the castle lost its military purpose and became a ruin. In 1956, Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein handed over ownership of the heavily overgrown ruin to the Historical Association of the Principality of Liechtenstein. This institution is the current owner and caretaker of the ruin and oversees its research, upkeep and preservation.

The castle ruin located in the municipality of Schellenberg, Liechtenstein. It lies at the western edge of Hinterschloss, one of the burroughs in the village of Neu-Schellenberg. It is freely open to tourists. Due to its close proximity to Hinterschloss, it is probably the most easily accessible of all Liechtenstein castles. Obere Burg is one of the five existing castles in Liechtenstein and one of the three ruined ones in the country.

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Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Liechtenstein

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User Reviews

Robert Wallace (12 months ago)
A beautiful view
Pascal De With (16 months ago)
I love Liechtenstein this little 'Burg" is free to visit and you can see the whole country from there (when clear wheather , and its a tiny nation)
Cathy Heller (20 months ago)
Glad we didn't miss this. I enjoyed seeing the ruins more than visiting the working castles.
Mark V (2 years ago)
Princely Liechenstein Tattoo. A great evening but there was more variety last time. A bit short on Bagpipes this year and a bit too much Irish dancing.
Emmanuel Weber (2 years ago)
Nice castle ruins, surrounded by beautiful mountains. My kids expected to find some treasures or secret rooms... They came back empty handed
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