Cathedrals in Portugal

Sé Catedral (Cathedral of Lisbon)

Lisbon's cathedral has a stark interior and differs from other European cathedrals in looking more like a castle.It was built over an old mosque and mixes the Romanesque and Gothic styles. While in other cities the cathedral is the grandest religious monument, in Lisbon that honor actually goes to the Hieronymus Monastery or even Basilica da Estrela. The site where it stands was the principal mosque of Lisbon when it wa ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Lisbon, Portugal

Porto Cathedral

The Porto Cathedral one of the city's oldest monuments and one of the most important local Romanesque monuments. Unlike what's often written, the current Cathedral of Porto was not built under the patronage of Bishop Hugo since the pre-Romanesque church is still mentioned in the De Expugnatione Lyxbonensias still extant in 1147. This means the present building was only started in the second half of the century and it ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Porto, Portugal

Braga Cathedral

Due to its long history and artistic significance, The Cathedral of Braga (Sé de Braga) is one of the most important buildings in the country.  The Diocese of Braga dates from the 3rd century AD, being one of the oldest in the peninsula and the centre for the Christianisation of Northwestern Iberia. When Roman power was being dissolved, Braga became the capital of the Suebi Kingdom (409 to 584). The importance of Braga ...
Founded: c. 1089 | Location: Braga, Portugal

Viana do Castelo Cathedral

The Cathedral of St. Mary the Great is a catholic church and fortress built in the fifteenth century, which preserves a Romanesque appearance. Its facade is flanked by two large towers topped by battlements and highlights its beautiful Gothic portal with archivolts with sculpted scenes from the Passion of Christ and sculptures of the Apostles. It is a Romanesque church with a Latin cross and inside is separated by thr ...
Founded: 1400 | Location: Viana do Castelo, Portugal

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.