Viana do Castelo Cathedral

Viana do Castelo, Portugal

The Cathedral of St. Mary the Great is a catholic church and fortress built in the fifteenth century, which preserves a Romanesque appearance.

Its facade is flanked by two large towers topped by battlements and highlights its beautiful Gothic portal with archivolts with sculpted scenes from the Passion of Christ and sculptures of the Apostles. It is a Romanesque church with a Latin cross and inside is separated by three arches supported on pillars ships. It is classified as Imóvel of Public Interesse.

Inside, are the chapels of St. Bernard (by Fernão Brandão) and the chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, attributed to stonemason, João Lopes the 'old'.

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Details

Founded: 1400
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Colin B (2 years ago)
It's not huge, Don't expect Canterbury or York in the UK but this is a manageable cathedral, think a big church. You have to recognise this is an ancient place but then wonder at the stonemasons work. Just has to be visited.
Aaron Ochse (2 years ago)
Very interesting cathedral. Beautiful sculptures.
Oscar Lugo (3 years ago)
It is cathedral not much to add
Vx2019 (3 years ago)
Good
Wojciech Wajs (5 years ago)
Such a beautiful place!
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