Viana do Castelo Cathedral

Viana do Castelo, Portugal

The Cathedral of St. Mary the Great is a catholic church and fortress built in the fifteenth century, which preserves a Romanesque appearance.

Its facade is flanked by two large towers topped by battlements and highlights its beautiful Gothic portal with archivolts with sculpted scenes from the Passion of Christ and sculptures of the Apostles. It is a Romanesque church with a Latin cross and inside is separated by three arches supported on pillars ships. It is classified as Imóvel of Public Interesse.

Inside, are the chapels of St. Bernard (by Fernão Brandão) and the chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, attributed to stonemason, João Lopes the 'old'.

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Details

Founded: 1400
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oscar Lugo (11 months ago)
It is cathedral not much to add
Vx2019 (17 months ago)
Good
Wojciech Wajs (3 years ago)
Such a beautiful place!
Nina MXANIME (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit. Parking here is very hard!
Natalia Paerez Moreno (3 years ago)
Perfect rock construction. It just amaze everyone.
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