Sé Catedral (Cathedral of Lisbon)

Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon's cathedral has a stark interior and differs from other European cathedrals in looking more like a castle.It was built over an old mosque and mixes the Romanesque and Gothic styles.

While in other cities the cathedral is the grandest religious monument, in Lisbon that honor actually goes to the Hieronymus Monastery or even Basilica da Estrela.

The site where it stands was the principal mosque of Lisbon when it was an Arab settlement. The construction of the cathedral started around 1150, three years after the city was conquered from the Moors during the Second Crusade. Shortly after the victory the English knight Gilbert of Hastings was named bishop of the city of Lisbon.

One good reason to visit the Cathedral is to visit its charming cloisters located in the back.There are several tombs in the cathedral, the most notable of which is the beautifully sculpted tomb of Lopo Fernandes Pacheco and his wife. He died in 1349 and was a knight of King D. Afonso IV.

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Address

Largo da Sé, Lisbon, Portugal
See all sites in Lisbon

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aluhe Xavier (19 months ago)
One of the oldest, and the most important church of Lisbon. It is in alfama. A beautiful tainted rose window...
Murat Uder (20 months ago)
Lisbon Cathedral is worth seeing and going up all those hills to reach. You can go there by taking the tram 28. No fee to enter the main section of the cathedral but there is a ticket needed to go further.
Anna Szumańska (20 months ago)
A cathedral from the 12th century, which was not demolished during the great earthquake of the 18th century. A monumental, raw appearance of the interior without unnecessary decorations. It is worth noting that it is located on the route of the famous yellow tram 28.
Subrata Chakrabarti (20 months ago)
An important historical building in Lisbon. We were staying in Prata Hotel, so I came here a few times. The first time was in the morning. The sun was low and bright and the Cathedral looked impressive as I was coming up the street which climbs up to the Cathedral. The interior is simple but interesting. There are paintings on the wall. Apparently, the Cathedral suffered damages from more than one earthquake. The structure has been rebuilt several times. Outside, people seat on the steps, yellow trams go up and down the front street. Ambience is friendly. There was a coffee kiosk half way down the street, selling coffee and snacks. Coffee was good.
João Manoel Lenz (21 months ago)
Not as beautiful or impressive as other cathedrals in Europe, but it's a place full of history and with some Moorish heritage. Entrance is free but there is also a small paid tour inside. It's worth stopping by only with you have more than one day in Lisbon.
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