Nuragic civilization

Nuraghe Nieddu

Nuraghe Nieddu is the best preserved nuraghe (main type of ancient megalithic edifice found in Sardinia) in the region. The  single tower nuraghe is 11m high and dates probably from the second millenium BCE. 
Founded: 1800-1400 BCE | Location: Codrongianos, Italy

Sa Figu Necropolis

The necropolis of Sa Figu, the most important prehistoric heritage of the territory of Ittiri, is a place where the pre-Nuraghic remnants ‘merge’ with the Nuragic monuments. It extends along the northern edge of the Coros plateau that gives its name to a Logudorese sub-region. Four kilometres from the town, the archaeological area can be reached from the sanctuary of San Maurizio by climbing up to the peak. The comple ...
Founded: 3000 BCE | Location: Ittiri, Italy

Lu Brandali Archaeological Site

The Lu Brandali site was discovered in the late 1960s by a young graduate Michele Careddu. It consists of a giants’ tomb, a nuragic village (seven huts have been excavated out of the 35 that exist and are still buried underground) and a nuragic tower.
Founded: 1400-1000 BCE | Location: Santa Teresa Gallura, Italy

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.