Sa Figu Necropolis

Ittiri, Italy

The necropolis of Sa Figu, the most important prehistoric heritage of the territory of Ittiri, is a place where the pre-Nuraghic remnants ‘merge’ with the Nuragic monuments. It extends along the northern edge of the Coros plateau that gives its name to a Logudorese sub-region. Four kilometres from the town, the archaeological area can be reached from the sanctuary of San Maurizio by climbing up to the peak. The complex is composed of eleven hypogea, a megalithic circle and the base of an archaic Nuraghe (or ‘protonuraghe’). It has survived at least three prehistoric eras: the late Neolithic (end of 4th millennium BC), when the first nucleus of Domus de Janas was excavated; the Eneolithic and Copper age; plus the Late and Mid Bronze, when hypogeum ‘architectural façades’ were widespread.

Of the sepultures of Sa Figu, three are simple and original Domus de Janas, two have a single cella and one had a number of cellae, with a Dromos (‘andito’), an anti-cella and a cella on which secondary areas open. At least three are expanded Domus, with additions to the façade of stele and exedra. Three are new set-ups or have been restructured in the Bronze Age. The largest tomb was originally composed of five rooms, becoming a single room following the demolition of the partition walls. An anti-cella with decorated walls leads into the cella where three rooms opened up. The hypogea have revealed a number of Nuragic finds, especially the famous bronze statuette of the launeddas player.

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Ittiri, Italy
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Details

Founded: 3000 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

www.sardegnaturismo.it

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sardigna natzione (2 years ago)
And a beautiful site abandoned to itself unfortunately where you can see a protonuraghe and several tombs dug out of the rock beyond the menhirs, a pity that the municipality is not able to enhance one of its beautiful archaeological sites vote at site 10 at municipality 0 !!!! !!
Layledda (2 years ago)
The megalithic circle is incomplete (some slabs have rolled downstream) but undoubtedly suggestive. To reach it, take the road to the nearby country church of San Maurizio. You will see the megaliths from the road, I recommend parking on the right of the same trying to find the easiest access to get to the plateau. There is no path so beware of brambles and nets. Do not miss the nearby domus with an architectural elevation at about two hundred meters
Francesca P (4 years ago)
Without someone to show you the way is unobtainable and still difficult to reach
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