Palaces, manors and town halls in Luxembourg

Grand Ducal Palace

The Grand Ducal Palace is the official residence of the Grand Duke of Luxembourg, and where he performs most of his duties as head of state of the Grand Duchy. The building was first the city hall of Luxembourg from 1572 to 1795, the seat of the prefecture of the Département des Forêts in 1795, and then the headquarters of the Luxembourg Government in 1817. From 1817, the palace became the residence of the G ...
Founded: 1572 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

Urspelt Castle

Though the Urspelt Castle has a history going back at least three centuries, today"s building dates from 1860. The origins of the castle go back more than 300 years when it was a small country property. Then in 1860, Amand Bouvier considerably expanded it. A new garden was laid out, now one of the area"s most notable parks with its avenues and elm trees. When Bouvier died in 1900, he left a magnificent estate to ...
Founded: 1860 | Location: Urspelt, Luxembourg

Château de Septfontaines

The Château de Septfontaines was built in 1783–1784 by Jean-François and Pierre-Joseph Boch, who had opened their nearby porcelain factory in 1767, when Luxembourg was part of the Austrian Netherlands. The brothers had chosen Rollingergrund for their factory, as it offered all that was needed: clay, water and wood for the ovens. It was designed so that both their families could live there, which explain ...
Founded: 1783 | Location: Luxembourg City, Luxembourg

Heisdorf Castle

Heisdorf Castle was built by Baron Lippmann in the late 19th century. Surrounded by a large park, it was designed by the Belgian architect Charles Thirion. In 1916, the Sisters of the Christian Doctrine acquired the property as a convalescent home for their community. In 1982, it was opened as an old people"s home under the name of Maison de retraite Marie-Consolatrice. In 2007, a new wing was added to the building b ...
Founded: 1888 | Location: Heisdorf, Luxembourg

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.