Though the Urspelt Castle has a history going back at least three centuries, today's building dates from 1860. The origins of the castle go back more than 300 years when it was a small country property. Then in 1860, Amand Bouvier considerably expanded it. A new garden was laid out, now one of the area's most notable parks with its avenues and elm trees. When Bouvier died in 1900, he left a magnificent estate to his nephew Alfred Bouvier but he and his descendents failed to show much interest in the property. During the Second World War, the Germans used the castle as their headquarters for northern Luxembourg until they were forced to abandon it to the Americans during the Battle of the Bulge in the winter of 1944. After the war, the castle fell into disrepair and was used only as a hunting lodge. Towards the end of the 20th century, the deserted building was increasingly invaded by the surrounding undergrowth.

After comprehensive restoration work and additions in 2005, it recently opened as a hotel and meeting centre. An old well, apparently dating back to an 11th-century stronghold, was found and renovated in a restoration. A second tower was added at the far end of the castle to house a lift.

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Founded: 1860
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Luxembourg

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angélica Nedog (20 months ago)
Excellent place to relax and enjoy a good meal.
johnnyamericano (20 months ago)
Wow...Amazing Place. Clervaux. Very good dinner.
Claudine Menoud (20 months ago)
Great breakfast, cozy rooms ' enjoyed the stay' would highly recommend
Bas Van Tongerloo (21 months ago)
Beautiful location. Food is ok. Room (328) very small
Marijke van Velsen (2 years ago)
Lovely hotel. Good size room, good beds. Nice breakfast as well with gluten free bread (available on request at check-in). Just one thing annoyed me. We had a room on the ground floor and the terrace is outside your door/window to the 'garden'. I like some privacy on my room but that meant closing the curtains. There's music coming from the garden as well and it's the same few songs on repeat until quite late.
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