Château de Septfontaines

Luxembourg City, Luxembourg

The Château de Septfontaines was built in 1783–1784 by Jean-François and Pierre-Joseph Boch, who had opened their nearby porcelain factory in 1767, when Luxembourg was part of the Austrian Netherlands. The brothers had chosen Rollingergrund for their factory, as it offered all that was needed: clay, water and wood for the ovens. It was designed so that both their families could live there, which explains why the first floor is divided into two separate sections for the bedrooms, while the rooms on the ground floor, including the dining room and lounge, could be used by both families.

The castle was once occupied by French troops and was sold in 1914. After Luitwin von Boch had acquired it once again in 1970 in the name of Villeroy & Boch, he charged his cousin Antoine de Schorlemer to undertake comprehensive renovation work which lasted a full 12 years.

The rooms now testify to the success of the Boch brothers. Porcelain of all shapes and sizes decorates the walls and the windows. In the dining room hangs a portrait of the Austrian empress Maria Theresa (1717–1780), who had allowed them to build their factory in Rollingergrund and who had freed them from taxation for the first ten years. Now available for business conferences and receptions, the building is still used by the management, partners and clients of Villeroy & Boch when they are in Luxembourg.

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Founded: 1783
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Luxembourg

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rebecca Mason (3 years ago)
Prretty and good for work events.
Lorne Jackman (3 years ago)
Thanks to Villeroy & Boch for the experience hosting us at the Chateau. And a wonderful visit to Luxembourg for the Culinary World Cup #ExpoGast
Enrique Puente (3 years ago)
Good for events.
Björn Sahlberg (3 years ago)
Beautiful building! Nice
Yves Barthels (3 years ago)
A historic place in a nice setting. The park outside is heavenly, but the interior is quite old, smelly and there is no aircon. Not ideal for a presentation at a conference in hot weather.
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