Religious sites in Luxembourg

Notre-Dame Cathedral

Notre-Dame Cathedral is the only cathedral in Luxembourg. The church is a noteworthy example of late gothic architecture; however, it also has many Renaissance elements and adornments. At the end of the 18th century, the church received the miraculous image of the Maria Consolatrix Afflictorum, the patron saint of both the city and the nation. Jesuits from Belgium, which like Luxembourg belonged to the Spanish Netherland ...
Founded: 1613 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

Saint Michael's Church

Saint Michael"s Church is the oldest extant religious site in Luxembourg City. The first church was built on the site in 987 as the castle chapel for the Count of Luxembourg. However, over the following centuries, the building was destroyed, rebuilt, and renovated several times. Its current appearance dates to 1688, and unites Romanesque and Baroque architectural styles, pre-dating the national Moselle Baroque style. ...
Founded: 1688 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

Trinity Church

Around 1313, Friedrich von Meysenburg had a chapel built on the site of current Trinity Church. In 1602, the Dominicans built a monastery around the church. When the Jesuits established themselves nearby and built the Athénée de Luxembourg and the Jesuit church, which is now Notre-Dame Cathedral, the Dominicans moved to the Fishmarket, and in 1628 sold the monastery and church to the Congrégation Notr ...
Founded: 1737 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

Neumünster Abbey

After the original Benedictine Abbey on the Altmünster Plateau had been destroyed in 1542, the monks built a new abbey or Neumünster in 1606 in the Grund. This in turn was destroyed by fire in 1684 but was rebuilt on the same site in 1688 and extended in 1720. After the French revolution, it served as a police station and prison before becoming a barracks for the Prussians after Napoleon"s defeat in 1815. F ...
Founded: 1606 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

Echternach Abbey

The Abbey of Echternach is a Benedictine monastery founded by St Willibrord, the patron saint of Luxembourg, in the 7th century. Lying on the River Sauer, Echternach had been the site of a 1st-century Roman villa. By the 6th century, the estate at Echternach had passed into the hands of the see of Trier, which had constructed a small monastery on the estate. In 698, Irmina of Oeren granted the Northumbrian missionary Will ...
Founded: 698 AD | Location: Echternach, Luxembourg

Quirinus Chapel

On its site of Quirinus Chapel was originally a heathen shrine which the Romans later worshipped as an early Christian sanctuary. Since the 11th century the site has been consecrated to Saint Quirin and from the beginning of the 13th, services were held in the two caves of the chapel. The Gothic pilgrimage chapel, partly hewn in the rock, was erected in 1355, while the roof and the small belltowers were added afterwards, ...
Founded: 1355 | Location: Luxemburg, Luxembourg

St Martin's church

St Martin"s church is an 18th-century listed building and Catholic parish church in Junglinster, Grevenmacher. It contains artworks and monuments from the older parish church that the building replaced. The oldest monuments commemorate members of the noble d"Orley family, to whom the Renaissance artist Bernard van Orley was related. The parish has existed since medieval times, but by 1688 the original church wa ...
Founded: 1774 | Location: Junglinster, Luxembourg

Trinitarian Church

Built entirely in 1248, the church of the Trinitarians is one of the finest expressions of Gothic art in Luxembourg. The large choir was added in 1644. The main altar, made in 1758 in Rococo style, is the work of the artist Michel Weiler. Beside the church, the former cloister of the Trinitarians (1250). The recumbent effigy of Marie de Spanheim (approx. 1400) preserves the memory of the last descendant of the Counts of V ...
Founded: 1248 | Location: Vianden, Luxembourg

St. Lawrence's Church

The 'Old Church' of Diekirch with its two naves in Gothic style, dates back to 1467. In the Merovingian period (6th and 7th centuries), a pre-Romanesque church was built in the place of a Gallo-Roman sanctuary, certain parts of whose walls are still visible today. In the 11th century, this building was replaced by a Romanesque church, whose tour has been kept (12th century). Inside, the church has fine frescoes dating fro ...
Founded: | Location: Dikrech, Luxembourg

Munshausen Church

The tower of Munshausen church from 1250 is in the Romanesque style while the nave underwent Gothic additions around 1470. There are tombstones of the Lords of Clervaux in the church
Founded: 1250 | Location: Munshausen, Luxembourg

St. Laurent Church

The old castle tower, which has been the belfry of the Parish Church, dedicated to St. Laurent (since 1782), is worth a visit. The former watchtower and fortresstower (26m high with walls 1,50 - 1,80m thick), was originately surrounded by a moat and is situated right in the centre of the old fortress.
Founded: | Location: Grevenmacher, Luxembourg

Wiltz Decanal Church

The architecture of the decanal church dates back to the Middle Ages. The oldest part of the church, the tower, contains the grave chambers of the Counts of Wiltz. The church was built in 1510 to the site of older church.
Founded: 1510 | Location: Wiltz, Luxembourg

Girsterklaus Chapel

Chapel of Girsterklaus was erected in the 14th century to the site of older foundations. It is the oldest place of pilgrimage to the Virgin in the Grand Duchy. The interior with its remains of frescoes is quite remarkable.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Girsterklaus, Luxembourg

St.Peter’s Church

St.Peter’s Church was built atop the ruins of a Roman villa and a merovingian tomb. A sketch made in 1571 by the abbot Bertels of the Münster Abbey shows a chapel with a rather simple architecture. It was replaced by a three-nave church later. Dominique-Henri de Neunheuser, vicar of Steinsel, bought in 1785 two stone altars from the Dominican monastery of Marienthal, which had been suspended under the reign of ...
Founded: 1851 | Location: Steinsel, Luxembourg

Saeul Church

The church of Saeul was first mentioned in 1318. The Romanesque architecture goes back to the 12th century. The renovation of the 1960 strengthens the formal structure with great simplicity. Some decorations are kept on the apsis. The remnants point out that the interior was once decorated by a pelt and even a painted façade. The spire was built in 1733. The cemetery was laid around the church. Some funeral monumen ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Saeul, Luxembourg

St. Marcus Chapel

The chapel of St Marcus is an important pilgrimage site, especially at the occasion of celebration of its holy protector (April 25 th). The precious sanctuary regularly houses classical music concerts. Since 1627 a hermit lived in the neighbouring hermitage. He was in charge of the security of the place. The actual form of the chapel dates back to the 16th century. The sanctuary presents tow naves separated by a colonnade ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Selz, Luxembourg

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Saint-Eustache

The Church of St Eustace was built between 1532-1632. St Eustace"s is considered a masterpiece of late Gothic architecture. The church’s reputation was strong enough of the time for it to be chosen as the location for a young Louis XIV to receive communion. Mozart also chose the sanctuary as the location for his mother’s funeral. Among those baptised here as children were Richelieu, Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, future Madame de Pompadour and Molière, who was also married here in the 17th century. The last rites for Anne of Austria, Turenne and Mirabeau were pronounced within its walls. Marie de Gournay is buried there.

The origins of Saint Eustache date back to 13th century. The church became a parish church in 1223, thanks to a man named Jean Alais who achieved this by taxing the baskets of fish sold nearby, as granted by King Philip Augustus. To thank such divine generosity, Alais constructed a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Agnès, a Roman martyr. The construction of the current church began in 1532, the work not being finally completed until 1637. The name of the church refers to Saint Eustace, a Roman general of the second century AD who was burned, along with his family, for converting to Christianity, and it is believed that it was the transfer of a relic of Saint Eustache from the Abbey to Saint-Denis to the Church of Saint Eustache which resulted in its naming. Jeanne Baptiste d"Albert de Luynes was baptised here.

According to tourist literature on-site, during the French Revolution the church, like most churches in Paris, was desecrated, looted, and used for a time as a barn. The church was restored after the Revolution had run its course and remains in use today. Several impressive paintings by Rubens remain in the church today. Each summer, organ concerts commemorate the premieres of Berlioz’s Te Deum and Liszt’s Christus here in 1886.

The church is an example of a Gothic structure clothed in Renaissance detail. The church is relatively short in length at 105m, but its interior is 33.45m high to the vaulting. At the main façade, the left tower has been completed in Renaissance style, while the right tower remains a stump. The front and rear aspects provide a remarkable contrast between the comparatively sober classical front and the exuberant rear, which integrates Gothic forms and organization with Classical details. The L"écoute sculpture by Henri de Miller appears outside the church, to the south. A Keith Haring sculpture stands in a chapel of the church.

The Chapel of the Virgin was built in 1640 and restored from 1801 to 1804. It was inaugurated by Pius VII on the 22nd of December, 1804 when he came to Paris for the coronation of Napoleon. The apse chapel, with a ribbed cul-de-four vault, has at its centre a sculpture of the Virgin and Child of Jean-Baptiste Pigalle that the painter Thomas Couture highlighted by three large paintings.

With 8,000 pipes, the organ is reputed to be the largest pipe organ in France, surpassing the organs of Saint Sulpice and Notre Dame de Paris. The organ originally constructed by P.-A. Ducroquet was powerful enough for the premiere of Hector Berlioz" titanic Te Deum to be performed at St-Eustache in 1855.